Sell together or separate (Bitcoin setup)?

It's been a long time since I've posted here but wanted to get some input on the best way to sell this. Recently I got a bunch of BitCoin farming gear that I need to sell on eBay and was wondering if it's smarter to sell together or since it's a little old now better to sell as individual components? I'll get the full list of everything later but here was a quick pic, I think there's 16 GPU's in total, some PSU's and other gear specific to mining.
 

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Trotter

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I read there is a run on AMD cards due to a new e-currency coming out. Iwould list it as a package, but if it doesn't pull enough split the GPUs into clusters.
 

~Darkseeker~

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R9 380X is still a pretty decent budget gaming card. You'd probably be able to sell them if you took all the cards out for maybe $80-100 each? However if you were honest about them being used for mining people might be put off, that's one of the most intense things you can do to a poor little AMD GPU :horse:

People are buying up the newer RX570 and RX580 cards for mining but in doing so they have created a huge global shortage of them. You might have some luck shifting them as a job lot since the new hot ticket mining item is really expensive due to there not being any...
 

~Darkseeker~

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Best short answer I can find:

"A CPU core can execute 4 32-bit instructions per clock (using a 128-bit SSE instruction) or 8 via AVX (256-Bit), whereas a GPU like the Radeon HD 5970 can execute 3200 32-bit instructions per clock (using its 3200 ALUs or shaders). This is a difference of 800 (or 400 in case of AVX) times more instructions per clock. As of 2011, the fastest CPUs have up to 6, 8, or 12 cores and a somewhat higher frequency clock (2000-3000 MHz vs. 725 MHz for the Radeon HD 5970), but one HD5970 is still more than five times faster than four 12-core CPUs at 2.3GHz (which would also set you back about $4700 rather than $350 for the HD5970)."

Obviously that's quite old as IPC for CPUs and GPUs are quite different, but GPUs are still the most 'efficient' (if you can even apply that term to a room full of hot noisy AMD graphics cards) way to mine cryptocurrency.
 

AMD_man

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Best short answer I can find:

"A CPU core can execute 4 32-bit instructions per clock (using a 128-bit SSE instruction) or 8 via AVX (256-Bit), whereas a GPU like the Radeon HD 5970 can execute 3200 32-bit instructions per clock (using its 3200 ALUs or shaders). This is a difference of 800 (or 400 in case of AVX) times more instructions per clock. As of 2011, the fastest CPUs have up to 6, 8, or 12 cores and a somewhat higher frequency clock (2000-3000 MHz vs. 725 MHz for the Radeon HD 5970), but one HD5970 is still more than five times faster than four 12-core CPUs at 2.3GHz (which would also set you back about $4700 rather than $350 for the HD5970)."

Obviously that's quite old as IPC for CPUs and GPUs are quite different, but GPUs are still the most 'efficient' (if you can even apply that term to a room full of hot noisy AMD graphics cards) way to mine cryptocurrency.
I know GPUs are better than CPUs, but there are special devices built for Bitcoin mining. I think they are called ACIS.
 

~Darkseeker~

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Sorry, I actually totally missed your action question... (derp)

There are some ASIC based units (ASIC is just a reference to app-specific integrated circuit, a general term) that exist for mining. Essentially arrays of ICs on a huge PCB. These are more power-efficient and in some cases more powerful in general, but I think they're quite inaccessible for most people.

Someone can jump on ebay and pick up a bunch of GPUs and build a mining rig, but you have to order ASIC units from manufacturers that are pretty scarce everyone but the USA (or so I'm lead to believe, never really looked much into it).

Essentially like with most things it comes down to accessibility of parts and upfront cost.

disclaimer: I am not and never have been a miner, I just get all this from people I know who do... they all use racks and racks of AMD R9 cards :lol:
 

AMD_man

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Sorry, I actually totally missed your action question... (derp)

There are some ASIC based units (ASIC is just a reference to app-specific integrated circuit, a general term) that exist for mining. Essentially arrays of ICs on a huge PCB. These are more power-efficient and in some cases more powerful in general, but I think they're quite inaccessible for most people.

Someone can jump on ebay and pick up a bunch of GPUs and build a mining rig, but you have to order ASIC units from manufacturers that are pretty scarce everyone but the USA (or so I'm lead to believe, never really looked much into it).

Essentially like with most things it comes down to accessibility of parts and upfront cost.

disclaimer: I am not and never have been a miner, I just get all this from people I know who do... they all use racks and racks of AMD R9 cards [emoji38]
From what I could gather, GPUs cause losses due to inefficiency (around $7-8 a month most times). I'm not sure if pools can make that any better though.

Also, you can get good miners (apparently good) for an average of $700. I'm not sure how many GPUs you need to match this miners, but if GPUs cause losses any other investment is worth it. All that considering you are not a tax evader [emoji14]

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/ol/B014OGCP6W/ref=mw_dp_olp?ie=UTF8&condition=all
 

Celery

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I now understand why with GPUs but I don't understand how the mining works.

I don't really care though.
 
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