Gaming build help

raidil

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So im working on my 1st solo build
So far i have the case its a apevia sniper
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00EF9QEZC/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apap_HVApLfENONoxQ

Now im looking at a mother board and more im thinking thr msi b150
I want to get a 1050ti grafic card was thinking matching msi one
Ram is kinston 2133
And going with last years i7 whats your thoughts tring to keep budgets down some is why ibwas thinking last years mother board and cpu

Heres the mother board
MSI Gaming Intel Skylake B150 LGA 1151 DDR4 USB 3.1 ATX Motherboard (B150 Gaming M3) https://www.amazon.com/dp/B014YN6732/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_vDPCzbFPAZDHZ

MSI Computer Video Graphic Cards GeForce GTX 1050 TI GAMING X 4G https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01MA62JSZ/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_-DPCzb83QC6N3

HyperX FURY Black 16GB Kit (2x8GB) 2133MHz DDR4 Non-ECC CL14 DIMM Desktop Memory (HX421C14FBK2/16) https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00TY6A1LY/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_DEPCzb691AY1R

So tell me am i issing something os there better for approx same price is there more on the mother board i should be looking for thanks dor your help
 

Smart_Guy

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Not sure about the prices for you (I kinda live in a different planet) but for gaming even 3rd gen. Core i5's and their attachments handle games well enough.

I'm on an stock i5 3570k and a GTX 680 4GB OC, and Dark Souls 3 plays just fine at 1080p max except for anti-aliasing and motion blur off. I finished the game. It plays even better than PS4 Pro on that +5 year old system. The point it that you have many budget options to choose between CPU's.

So if you can find a 4th gen. Core i7 (if you want an i7, tho i5 is enough for games) in good price then go for it (that's i7 4xxx). Since the CPU is the most expensive part you're looking at, look for it first then decide on the motherboard and the RAM since they are CPU dependent.

As for the GTX 1050Ti you're looking at, if you wanna have the cheapest option, make sure it is at stock that does not require extra power from the PSU. You can confirm that if there is no power socket on it. Also make sure it is 4GB not 2GB. Just make sure the PSU is good to run the system.

Good luck :)
 

~Darkseeker~

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I'd go for a Ryzen CPU, probably a Ryzen 5 1600, and divert any money you save towards going one level up on the GPU.

Intel stuff stays expensive for ages, I mean Sandy bridge CPUs are still a hundred bones on ebay and they're 6 years old. Ryzen 5 trades blows with the i5 and even the i7 in gaming tasks, unless you're getting a really huge GPU like a 1080Ti you don't need more than a Ryzen 5/i5 as you're never going to bottleneck a 1050 or 1060.
 

Smart_Guy

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If AMD is an option, Ryzen sounds like a good choice too. I agree. Just make sure you look at the prices and practicality of the supporting motherboards since it is kinda new. Price difference in motherboard could be the difference maker for budget builds.
 
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~Darkseeker~

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At launch, Ryzen had problems with memory compatibility and overclocking. Most manufacturers have released a bundle of BIOS updates and microcode hotfixes since launch - they've also got a lot more 'Ryzen compliant' memory now.

some thing's I'll say about Ryzen:-

1. Make sure you update the BIOS on whatever board you're using before you try and use it, to the latest version the manufacturer provides. This is best practice anyway, regardless of intel or AMD.
2. Faster memory scales much more noticibly with Ryzen than Intel, the difference in performance between 2133MHz and 2400MHz RAM is really obvious when gaming (5-10FPS in some cases) as Ryzen uses the RAM speed as the clock for the Infinity Fabric that connects internal parts of the CPU together. Essentially, the faster the RAM the faster your CPU, right the way up to 3200MHz. However, Many Ryzen CPUs won't run memory higher than 2400MHz as this is the maximum guaranteed memory speed supproted by the CPU, anything higher is an overclock.
3. Don't bother buying an Aftermarket cooler if you buy a non-X CPU, all AMD Ryzen CPUs regardless of SKU are unlocked for overclocking, but most Ryzen CPUs come with a pretty decent stock cooler (Wraith Stealth/Spire).
4. You can save some money if you don't plan to overclock by going with an A series motherboard, rather than a B or X series. However, think about this carefully as the A series have limited SATA ports and don't support crossfire or SLI.
5. Don't buy any Ryzen CPU with an 'X' in the name. They are just slight clock speed boosts to non-X CPUs and carry a pointless price premium. ALL CPUs on Ryzen, X or no X, are unlocked so you really get no value from buying an X series chip. I think that's just a marketing ploy by AMD to trick people who usually buy Intel into buying the X series thinking that's the overclocking model!
 
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Smart_Guy

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If those solve all compatibility/practicality issues, then I guess the motherboard prices are the remaining matter. It is up to the OP'er to find out about that. I'm no good with prices.
 

~Darkseeker~

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Prices are more or less in the order of:-

A320 (Lowest end AM4 Chipset) - $50-£80
B350 (Mid Range) - $60-£130
X370 (High End) - $80-£280

(Lifted from Newegg US)

Main differences are:-
A series: Does not support overclocking, limited SATA and USB ports.
B Series: supports overclocking, but not SLI or Crossfire - more SATA/USB.
X Series: enthusiast class, supports OC and SLI/Crossfire. Lots of SATA/USB.

all three series of boards feature things like m.2 at some price points and have varying numbers of PCI Express connectors and expansion. Low end X370 boards have about the same level of I/O as a high end A series, but no Xfire or OC.
 

AMD_man

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Prices are more or less in the order of:-

A320 (Lowest end AM4 Chipset) - $50-£80
B350 (Mid Range) - $60-£130
X370 (High End) - $80-£280

(Lifted from Newegg US)

Main differences are:-
A series: Does not support overclocking, limited SATA and USB ports.
B Series: supports overclocking, but not SLI or Crossfire - more SATA/USB.
X Series: enthusiast class, supports OC and SLI/Crossfire. Lots of SATA/USB.

all three series of boards feature things like m.2 at some price points and have varying numbers of PCI Express connectors and expansion. Low end X370 boards have about the same level of I/O as a high end A series, but no Xfire or OC.
The B350s do support Crossfire, they don't support dual x8 lanes though.

If you are using Crossfire on a B350 you'll get 16 lanes for the first card and only 4 for the second one, which will cause some bottlenecking on the second, and no improvement on the first card.
 

~Darkseeker~

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The B350s do support Crossfire, they don't support dual x8 lanes though.

If you are using Crossfire on a B350 you'll get 16 lanes for the first card and only 4 for the second one, which will cause some bottlenecking on the second, and no improvement on the first card.
I'll adjust my wording there, it does support Dual GPUs... it's just really pointless and not recommended :p
 

raidil

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Op here
Im thinking im going to stay intel sence i know them better and i love nvidia cards but i have no clue on mother board and need help there and for one that fits the case i just got thanks
 
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