Why is it so hard to find a detailed motherboard manual?

CFu

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For example, for a modern OEM ASUS laptop motherboard I can only find the dumbed down user manual on the manufacturer's website (not the actual motherboard manual).

I'm looking for the motherboard manual which has instructions on for example: form factor (ATX, micro-ATX, mini-ATX,..), how to reset the BIOS, how to upgrade the BIOS, what jumpers represent what, electrical scheme/design (complete with transistor types, voltages, etc). In other words, specialized information, not general information.

In summary: the OEM manufacturer manuals out there are too plain, simple and lacking detail. Where do I find the actual technical motherboard manuals like the ones I described above?
 

CFu

Baseband Member
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You are very offensive without even knowing me.

First of all, I have a two degrees in Computer Science and second of all, I understand electricity, components, voltages and everything (for which I also studied).

You misunderstood that I didn't know how to do those tasks I asked about. Wrong, I know how to do them perfectly. They were merely examples to illustrate what kind of information you should find in a manual.

I'm done with you. Go disrespect someone else.
 

AMD_man

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Computer science has nothing to do with electrical components and circuits. The fact that you even mentioned it is strange. Basic knowledge about electrical components and "voltages" is not nearly enough to understand such a complicated circuit. The fact that you don't know that is also strange. Even electronic engineers would have a hard time with it.

Also, why on earth would they put that in a manual if only 2% of the population would understand it? I don't think you comprehend the degree of technology you ar talking about here. Do you even know how many transistors are in there? If you do, a little common sense would tell you a block diagram would be huge and pointless.

I never meant it as an offensive comment. I said you as in "the majority of people". I apologize if you were offended, but I do not apologize for being honest.
 

cb600fshornet

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I'm afraid I too have found these hard to come by. You can often identify the components (if you're hoping to replace them) by removing them and taking a look at what they are. This doesn't help if you're trying to troubleshoot a faulty component though. Sometimes you get lucky and the identification is on the top!

Capacitors are obviously the easiest to troubleshoot on desktop boards, though I have known people replace chips on a laptop motherboard when they've been able to track the fault down. It's barely worth doing though as sometimes it can take a fair while to track any issues back.

Most boards do have the jumper details and such in their manuals. Though I admit when you buy a motherboard on its own you tend to get a far better manual.


Are you asking for a block diagram with each specific component and voltage values? I don't think you would ever understand such a thing
He could've had an MSc in Electrical Engineering and worked for Vishay for all you know :rolleyes:
 
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OEM mobos do not generally reelease info to the public until after the product has been phased out and is no longer under any warranty.
Te best way to go is to buy a mobo from a manufacturer that comes with the instructions and specs booklet and build on that.
Alternatively you can become a OEM builder and order a few thousand mobos from a manufacturer and they will provide data to you.

---------- Post added at 10:00 PM ---------- Previous post was at 09:58 PM ----------

Even so it would be so big and messy no one could understand it from scratch. If he can, then... :bow:
Speak for yourself. It might be true that you wouldn't understand it and if that's the case then feel free to say so, but you look foolish assuming anything about what others are capable of.
 

AMD_man

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Speak for yourself. It might be true that you wouldn't understand it and if that's the case then feel free to say so, but you look foolish assuming anything about what others are capable of.
Not foolish, realistic. If you can't understand why, that's because you can't even imagine what such a circuit would look like. Do you even know how many components a motherboard has? It's not a matter of knowledge, but a matter of space and time.
 
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You think making assumptions about people you never met is not foolish but realistic, then you have a lot to learn.
 
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