Which road leads to a better education?

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office politics

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Which road leads to a better education?

I believe in the importance of continuing education. I’m sure many IT personnel agree education is important — but finding high-quality, security-related courses and avoiding time-wasters is a problem. Also, in the debate on certification vs. getting a degree, who’s the real winner? Even if you go the degree route, many people think a bachelor’s degree is not enough. When given a choice, which should be pursued — a bachelor’s degree, a master’s degree or official certification?

— Wesley, Tech


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raross

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csamuels said:
Which road leads to a better education?

I believe in the importance of continuing education. I’m sure many IT personnel agree education is important — but finding high-quality, security-related courses and avoiding time-wasters is a problem. Also, in the debate on certification vs. getting a degree, who’s the real winner? Even if you go the degree route, many people think a bachelor’s degree is not enough. When given a choice, which should be pursued — a bachelor’s degree, a master’s degree or official certification?

— Wesley, Tech


**follow link above for more**

Coming out of high school I would be very afraid if I knew I was not going to have a college education in 4 years. Now a days everyone is expected to go to college. College is becoming the next high school, it is almost a certain requirement. Over time this will only get harsher.

If you want to be up to par with everyone else, you need a college education. If you want to stand out, get a masters. Although certification is nice, it does not offer you the benefits of a degree.

1. People will look down on you without at least a 4 year degree (this will only get worse as more kids go to college out of high school).

2. Without a college education you are limited on moving on up in the company.

3. If you ever want to change careers, it will almost be impossible without having to go back to college.

4. You will always be the under dog working your *** off to get what someone with a degree has.

5. You will also have to deal with salary minimization, by doing the same job as someone with a degree you will get paid less, just because you are less "qualified."

6. For most jobs degrees are a requirement unless you're an unskilled worker.

I have seen people with a meaningless degree (history) get a job in the IT industry competing with people with just certifications and experience. So even if you do not get a computer related degree, it will still open a lot of doors for you.

Just some of the benefits I could think of off the top of my head.
 

office politics

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i'll encourage any HS grad to goto college. For schools around my area, you dont have to declare a major until junior year. I would suggest this but it is an option and avoids the "well i dunno what i wanna be" rebuttal.

ross, you keep hammering away saying "People will look down on you without at least a 4 year degree". I dont think that college is the only way to be successful in this industry. Prime example is my company's network admin. No college degree, but instead got MCSE & MCDBA. And that's my rebuttal for your points # 4 & 5. I'm gonna drive this one home on ya, "Experience is golden". He worked his *** off to get the certs and apply them to the job. He did some great things for the company.

i think im starting to go on with the same rant ive been posting for months. But the point i want to get across is that employers shouldn't be looking at education first, but instead the interviewee's skill set. If you have the skills to perform the job and back it up with years experience, you should be in. That's why i'll also tell younger ppl to try to get a job in the field and if you can't pick up a ******** internship (prolly nonpay) where you can make business contacts. If you can impress ppl there, they might have opportunities for you. Its not only what you know but who you know as well.
 

jaeusm

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But the point i want to get across is that employers shouldn't be looking at education first, but instead the interviewee's skill set.
I agree with you, but it doesn't work that way in the majority of real world jobs. Some companies, like Honeywell, have corporate directives that require candidates to have a degree to even be considered for some positions. No degree, no interview -- regardless of relevant experience.
 

raross

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csamuels said:
i'll encourage any HS grad to goto college. For schools around my area, you dont have to declare a major until junior year. I would suggest this but it is an option and avoids the "well i dunno what i wanna be" rebuttal.

ross, you keep hammering away saying "People will look down on you without at least a 4 year degree". I dont think that college is the only way to be successful in this industry. Prime example is my company's network admin. No college degree, but instead got MCSE & MCDBA. And that's my rebuttal for your points # 4 & 5. I'm gonna drive this one home on ya, "Experience is golden". He worked his *** off to get the certs and apply them to the job. He did some great things for the company.

i think im starting to go on with the same rant ive been posting for months. But the point i want to get across is that employers shouldn't be looking at education first, but instead the interviewee's skill set. If you have the skills to perform the job and back it up with years experience, you should be in. That's why i'll also tell younger ppl to try to get a job in the field and if you can't pick up a ******** internship (prolly nonpay) where you can make business contacts. If you can impress ppl there, they might have opportunities for you. Its not only what you know but who you know as well.

I also agree, but like jaeusm and I have stated for many companies a degree is a requirement. Like I have stated before, this requirement will only get harsher as time goes on as more people are college educated. And if the majority of people are college educated and you're not, how is that going to look on you?

When you're talking about your friend with certifications, ok this is fine. I never said it could not happen, it is just not likely. I am not the kind of person that is willing to gamble with my life. I was speaking in generalities, rather then absolute assurance. The majority of the people without college degrees will be making less then their counterparts. I will give you a prime example: my mother was fortunate enough to go to college 30 years ago and get a med tech degree. Since there is a huge shortage of jobs for nursing and so on, they will allow these people with 2 year degrees come in and do the same job my mom does. But instead of getting paid 40 dollars an hour, they get paid 12. Now do you want to be the people sitting on the sidelines watching other people make 40 dollars for the same job you're doing? It is unfair, but it is the way our society works in ranking people based on education and job status.

I agree with experience, but it seems like the only way to get the experience you need for the job you want is to have a 4 year degree these days. I am sure you could spend numerous years working your way up from the bottom, but then when you got where you wanted you would not be satisfied with your pay or anything else (because of the years it took to actually get the experience). There are so many limitations for not having a degree that it is just better to buckle down and get one. Even though it may be unfair, it is the world we live in and there is no way to get around it.
 
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