What programming language to learn and how?

Gamernerd212

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What programming language should I learn and how should I learn it? I want something that will help me in the future and is pretty easy. Should I learn it by YouTube or something or how? Thanks!
 

XPikachu

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start with JavaScrpit in web pages it's easy for newbe progammers.

i started with JavaScrpit, then moved onto Java - more intence then JavaScrpit.

i hate C, basic etc..

that might be that i am used to Java applets for sites etc...
 
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Gamernerd212

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start with JavaScrpit in web pages it's easy for newbe progammers.

i started with JavaScrpit, then moved onto Java - more intence then JavaScrpit.

i hate C, basic etc..

that might be that i am used to Java applets for sites etc...

Okay thank you I really need to know this! Will do Javascript then Java and maybe C if I want to probably not if you hate it 😂. Thanks again!
 

OhSnapWord

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I started with web languages like HTML and JavaScript. I moved towards Visual Basic, C++ and Java.
 

yuki1114

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i hate SCRIPT LANGUAGES(js, php and so on).
But, Python is very simple and easy to use and i like it very much.
java is too heavy to coding simple programming
C is too difficult to newers.

if you are not going to learn programming serious,
then i suggest python.
 

Gamernerd212

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i hate SCRIPT LANGUAGES(js, php and so on).
But, Python is very simple and easy to use and i like it very much.
java is too heavy to coding simple programming
C is too difficult to newers.

if you are not going to learn programming serious,
then i suggest python.

Oh okay I'm pretty serious since I'm going to pursue it in the future. Might start with python and/or finish HTML then move onto more difficult stuff like c then Java. This is going to take awhile but I'll do it. Where can I learn python and C?
 

berry120

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I threw up a sticky you may be interested in a while back - my recommendation would be Java to begin with. Python wouldn't be a terrible choice either though.

And for all those out there that are mentioning HTML, repeat after me:

HTML is not a programming language.
HTML is not a programming language.
HTML is not a programming language.
 
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Dieter

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I agree with python, it's a pretty basic language. I would move from python to java and then to c++. From my experience and well as my friends this seems to the general consensus as far as a "difficultly ladder" would go. Java and C++ are used a lot in the industry so it would be beneficial to ultimately understand those.

As far as preparing for the future it really depends on what you plan on doing. A lot of the semiconductor industry would prefer to have C++ experience where mobile applications and software programmers like to use a lot of java.

The best way to learn a language in my opinion is to sit down and code. There are hundreds of e-books available on the internet for almost every language.
 

_michaelm

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I would seriously debate the value of learning HTML, SQL or similar 'languages' for someone looking to try to program. These are very specific tools for structuring web pages and query databases - you can't learn the computer science concepts (i.e. Data structures & Algorithms) using anything of this sort.

From the sentiment in your original post I can sense that you aren't entirely sure what you want to learn or what you could use it for - but you recognise that it is a valuable skill which could be very useful in the future. This is entirely true, and prior to going to university is exactly how I started. I discovered that my university taught via Java in the first year and so focused my attention on learning that through the summer prior to starting.

I debate this very topic often with my colleagues at work (all very experienced programmers with familiarity of all major languages) and although it is somewhat against the majority, we believe that C is in fact a good choice of language you can begin learning programming with for a few main reasons:

1) It is very clear and well defined
2) It does not 'hide' detail from the programmer - making the actual work involved in 'one line of code' really relate to one line of code (unlike heavily abstracted languages such as Java and Python - both of which definitely have their place, in my opinion after the individual has understood what goes on underneath and just wants to write programs faster, using libraries of built-in resources)
3) It is a small language - I can't stress this enough, something which makes python and java so good (and therefore so bad in the case) is the sheer number of libraries, functions and different ways to do the same thing. This makes learning via cause and effect much more difficult
4) Java, Python (and many other languages) are themselves written in C. Therefore once C is understood then it is MUCH easier to visualise how these other abstracted languages can implement their advanced constructs 'under the hood'. This is a skill which separates experienced programmers and opens significant doors in terms of career opportunities.

Overall, I believe that any attempt to learn programming is a good one - and I don't think there is a 'bad' language to do first, just some which are easier to grasp than others and some which will underpin more of the computer science fundamentals.

Essentially, the choice is yours but I hope this has provided you with something to consider. Good luck in your journey, I hope it treats you well!
 
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