Ubuntu PXE install XP

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TheDancingFetus

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I recently setup my Ubuntu Netbook up as a PXE server. I have the DHCP server setup with pxelinux.0 as the filename in dhcp3.conf. PC's boot from my laptop fine and gets to an install screen, and can pull and install the ubuntu image from my laptop using tftp. I think I just need to know how to make an image that is compatible with the tftp server, but I'm not sure. I just doing this as a learning exercise, so any information would be greatly appreciated.
 
Hm, what exactly are you using to make this happen? Are you trying to just utilize a bunch of different components to ultimately create your own imaging server?

I couldn't help but to notice TFTP, PXE, Ubuntu, etc. What is your ultimate goal? To be able to PXE boot systems and image them, whether they be Linux or Windows? If so, I suggest you look at FOG. If it's what you want to do and you need help setting it up, I can link you to a guide I created.

Otherwise if I'm way off on what you're trying to accomplish, I'll just shut up. :p
 
This is the first time I've heard of FOG. I'm currently have Ubuntu 10.04 on my Netbook. I have it setup as a DHCP server and I have configured it to netboot PC's to an Ubunut install screen. I have figured out how to add options to the install menu, and get it to successfully install other Linux distros over the network by modifying the "default" file in pexlinux.0 . I would like to add a XP install to the mix, but I'm lost on how to create one. I am interested of Imaging PC's over the network as well, but I've mainly been focusing on installing multiple OS's on multiple machines simultaneously.
 
FOG might be able to do what you need. I've imaged about... geez... we have about 1700 systems that I originally imaged from last year, but some of them I redid since then. I'd estimate I imaged a total of 2,400 systems since I've used FOG. All of them were done "over the network". I put that in quotes because I didn't put FOG on our main network. I simply used my Ubuntu laptop and a 24 port gigabit switch. I would just walk into a lab and basically had my own little secluded lan by hooking the PCs up to the switch, PXE boot them, then my laptop handed out IP addresses since FOG installs the DHCP service during the installation process. Then the machines "register" to FOG. At that point I can command them accordingly. I add them to 1 group, and tell that group to deploy image "Lab 110" or whatever my image is called. Reboot the systems, PXE boot them, they all grab an IP and the imaging process takes over.

Can FOG be used over the main network? Absolutely. I just didn't do that because I work in a total of 8 buildings, some of which are distanced far apart. Imaging across external lines like that from 1 building to another would suck, and it just made sense to manage one "server" (my laptop) and have it mobile.

But what you speak of may be in direct line with what FOG can do. I suggest you take a look at it. It bailed us out BIGTIME last year, because we had a unique opportunity (that will probably never happen again) to refresh the vast majority of systems in the district. The problem was our cloning methods until that point was a simple 5x hard drive cloner. Which worked nicely, but it was relatively slow, and could only do 5 drives at a time. FOG was a blessing, which allowed us to plug in an ethernet cable instead of ripping the drive out. Not to mention I could do 23 clients at once (24 port switch, 1 to server) in the same time as the cloner would do 5 drives. Ahhh, efficiency. I love it. :)

Anyway, if you choose to continue with your current method, I can't help any further cause it seems that you're getting into some real technical areas I don't have experience with. However, if you do check out FOG and have questions, I could try my best to help since I do have some experience in that department.

I put together a guide a while back. It has some screenshots if you want to check out the interface, etc. Also just keep in mind, imaging will only be as fast as the server's network port. AKA - my laptop had a gig port, and I used a gig switch, which made things fly nicely. If my laptop has a 100 meg port and I had a 100 meg switch, I would have been waiting a bit longer for the job to get done. :p

Google Docs

Good luck.
 
I would like to do exactly that with my laptop. Walk into a building with a switch and image computers. If fog will allow my to do network installs of images this will definitely the solution I'm looking for. I will check out FOG. Thanks for the help!
 
FOG might be able to do what you need. I've imaged about... geez... we have about 1700 systems that I originally imaged from last year, but some of them I redid since then. I'd estimate I imaged a total of 2,400 systems since I've used FOG. All of them were done "over the network". I put that in quotes because I didn't put FOG on our main network. I simply used my Ubuntu laptop and a 24 port gigabit switch. I would just walk into a lab and basically had my own little secluded lan by hooking the PCs up to the switch, PXE boot them, then my laptop handed out IP addresses since FOG installs the DHCP service during the installation process. Then the machines "register" to FOG. At that point I can command them accordingly. I add them to 1 group, and tell that group to deploy image "Lab 110" or whatever my image is called. Reboot the systems, PXE boot them, they all grab an IP and the imaging process takes over.

Can FOG be used over the main network? Absolutely. I just didn't do that because I work in a total of 8 buildings, some of which are distanced far apart. Imaging across external lines like that from 1 building to another would suck, and it just made sense to manage one "server" (my laptop) and have it mobile.

But what you speak of may be in direct line with what FOG can do. I suggest you take a look at it. It bailed us out BIGTIME last year, because we had a unique opportunity (that will probably never happen again) to refresh the vast majority of systems in the district. The problem was our cloning methods until that point was a simple 5x hard drive cloner. Which worked nicely, but it was relatively slow, and could only do 5 drives at a time. FOG was a blessing, which allowed us to plug in an ethernet cable instead of ripping the drive out. Not to mention I could do 23 clients at once (24 port switch, 1 to server) in the same time as the cloner would do 5 drives. Ahhh, efficiency. I love it. :)

Anyway, if you choose to continue with your current method, I can't help any further cause it seems that you're getting into some real technical areas I don't have experience with. However, if you do check out FOG and have questions, I could try my best to help since I do have some experience in that department.

I put together a guide a while back. It has some screenshots if you want to check out the interface, etc. Also just keep in mind, imaging will only be as fast as the server's network port. AKA - my laptop had a gig port, and I used a gig switch, which made things fly nicely. If my laptop has a 100 meg port and I had a 100 meg switch, I would have been waiting a bit longer for the job to get done. :p

Google Docs

Good luck.




Hi can i use this for windows 7 as well
 
Hi can i use this for windows 7 as well

You absolutely can. In fact FOG was the first to support Windows 7 cloning, even before Norton Ghost and Windows 7's formal release. :p Just be aware (if memory serves me right) Windows 7 by default creates a 100mb partition at the front of the disk, even if you say "No I only want one partition." As a result, just make sure you make the corresponding changes within the FOG interface for the Windows 7 image you're dealing with that it is multiple partition image and not a single partition image. You'll see what I mean when you get to this step, but that's the only curve ball with Windows 7 over Windows XP. Other than that it should be easy to handle, and of course if you run into any snags, post back here. ;)

@ TheDancing - how did things turn out for you? Have you gotten it up and running?
 
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