Replacing my computer

PP Mguire

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Be careful, M.2, if occupied, in known to disable some SATA ports. You need to make sure there's at least one SATA port enabled to install another internal storage. If it is not clarified on the link, perhaps contacting them for one is a good idea. OEM like to limit ports to close to what they need only to reduce prices. Oh, an also make sure the power supply has a free SATA power too. OEM upgrades surprised many before.
The HP comes with a 1TB spinner so if he wanted to swap that out to an SSD he could.
 

bluenose1940

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It would seem that the HP unit overcomes the problem as there are two drives installed and, as PP Mguire says, I could replace the HDD with an SSD at some point.
Does that make the HP the better bet overall then and is it worth the extra £110.00?
 

Smart_Guy

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110 more than the Dell? if so, I suggest contacting Dell and see if they have an upgrade plan for the Storage to add a secondary and see how much it costs. I think 110 is too much for just the extra HDD, and I don't see any more specs that make a difference for your use. Personally I'd just make sure the build can take and extra SATA device and do the upgrade myself for cheap. But confirming this requires time with OEM. If they respond properly, that is.

Personally I suggest an HDD for the secondary drive as it is for important files unlike the OS drive (comparatively) which in worst case scenario can just be formatted and Windows will be activated automatically if it comes OEM per-installed. I believe SSD's are still not as reliable as HDD's if both are stationary and HDD speeds are enough for your use. Unless you want a rally huge difference in data transfer, I think HDD is enough. For both reliability and price. In my experience, the reliability is 3 to 1 in HDD's favor, and I used so many HDD's than SSD's.

The point we were talking about earlier was for a secondary storage to preserve data better, not having it SSD. I'm guessing you asked for SSD in the first place to have Windows run fast only? Keep in mind that per GB, SSD are more expensive than HDD. Last time I checked it was 2-3 times more expensive, but I'm not sure.
 

bluenose1940

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If you are still about PP Mguire and Smart_Guy, can I ask you a question please. It was mentioned by Smart-Guy at post #6 in this thread that I might be able to use the HDD from my current pc, by installing it in the one I am thinking of buying (Link below).

If I tell you that this HDD is a Western Digital 1TB drive with the following numbers - WD1001FAES-75W7A0, can you tell me if this will work in the new pc?
I'm not sure if it might be too old, you may be able to confirm this for me.

The chances are that I will buy this machine, even if I have to get a different HDD (i.e. can't use my existing one) and I will also do as PP Mguire suggests and add another 8GB of memory.

Thanks again for the help chaps.

https://www.dell.com/en-uk/work/sho...o-3671-desktop/s112vd3671btsukie01_r2005_22nm
 

bluenose1940

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The drive is currently my D: drive and holds all of my personal files and data. There is no O/S or programmes on it, I always keep them on separate drives.
My question really is, is the specification good enough and compatible despite its age?
 

Smart_Guy

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Yes, the old HDD with code WD1001FAES-75W7A0 is a good HDD. It's of the higher tier of Western Digital HDD's. It's designed for high performance. Not like SSD's but it's more than fast enough for your use. It's a series called black. However, I suggest you check its health with any such software like https://www.hdsentinel.com/ and see if the HDD is healthy. Just in case you're considering the future of it.

And yes, I second PP, it is compatible.

If it's just data, you can just add it to the computer if there's space and connections available. I highly recommend contacting the new comp provider to make sure of it (if no datasheet clarifies it). Ask them if there are vacant slot, data SATA cable and port, power SATA cable and if the M.2 (if there) does not disable the data SATA port.

Now I could be wrong here, but I don't think over 8GB RAM is useful unless the spread sheets you speak of are huge with many calculations. It could give a boost for you, but not to the extent it gives for gamers and encoders, for example. However, if the current RAM is only one chip, adding another chip with give a good boost for anyone since then it will enable a mechanism called Dual Channel that improves overall performance. If you are on a budget, I suggest skipping it, but if you're willing to, I say go for it. I know I would.
 

bluenose1940

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That all sounds pretty good Smart_Guy. Within the new machine there are vacant slots to take 2 x 2.5 inch drives and 1 x 3.5inch drive.
I can't imagine that the M.2 would disable anything as the configurations available include the SATA HDD's
I have attached the available configurations so that you can see for yourself.

With regards to the additional RAM, it would appear that another 8GB is only around the £30.00 mark and so well worth having i think.

Thanks for being so helpful. I will probably place my order today.
Storage specs.jpg
 

PP Mguire

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Can't speak for Dell, but I've worked with HP enterprise machines for the past 6 years and never came across an instance where an M.2 disabled a SATA.
 
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