Redundant router for failover

tommyboy123x

Daemon Poster
Messages
654
I'm playing around with rediculous redundancy in my home network.

I have 2 independent WAN connections going to a Cisco router (failover/failback is set up). From that, it goes to an Asus router.

From that Cisco router, I want two wireless routers set up so that if one wireless router crashes, all other devices can swap to the other.

Is this even possible or realistic?

Again, this is more of an experiment than a need - I'm trying to make every piece of the wireless network have a redundant backup so that (in theory) no single device or service failure could interrupt my connection.
 

tommyboy123x

Daemon Poster
Messages
654
Best attempt at a network map lol

ISP1 - - > - - \/
[ Cisco] - - - > [asus] - - - - -> [DEVICES]​
ISP2 - - > - ^ port1 ^ - + - ^ port2 ^

Theoretical problem is, if asus router fails, all internet fails. Is there a way to avoid that bottleneck?

It feels like there should be a way to put some kind of "cloned" wireless router from the Cisco box, so if one asus router fails, the other steps in immediately.

Thoughts?
 
Last edited:

Yami

Lady Techie
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8,140
Location
UK
This is definitely feasible, and exists in a majority of business environments (well, less so an entire redundant wireless network, but the general idea!).

When you say wireless router are you referring to an actual router, or just a wireless switch (AP (access point))?

If you have two wireless switches, if they're running the same SSIDs (in the same BSSID/ESSID), your devices should just automatically switch over to the same SSID being broadcast by the other wireless switch.

I actually have this setup at home, with each AP set to use distinct wireless channels (44 and 48 respectively) so they're non-overlapping for interference. In fact, since one is upstairs and one is downstairs, devices should automatically switch to the AP with the stronger signal as the user walks between floors.
 

PP Mguire

Build Guru
Messages
30,687
Location
Fort Worth, Texas
I actually have this setup at home, with each AP set to use distinct wireless channels (44 and 48 respectively) so they're non-overlapping for interference. In fact, since one is upstairs and one is downstairs, devices should automatically switch to the AP with the stronger signal as the user walks between floors.
Figure this only works if the hardware supports roaming.
 
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