Potentially the longest thread in history...

Trotter

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They built their houses different then. Most were "shotgun" houses that had a breezeway through the center of the house. They made use of shade trees and knew how to utilize the shade to cool the whole house.
 

PP Mguire

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Of course, but did it affect population growths of these cities?

https://www.livescience.com/45268-who-invented-air-conditioning.html
I would say motorized vehicles helped with population growth in these areas more than AC because they were less accessible by horse and carriage. The Dallas population chart almost doubles with each "modernization" in technological enhancement.
https://worldpopulationreview.com/us-cities/dallas-tx-population

I mean, in 1880 Dallas was at 10 thousand people, which compared to the north east might be small but in terms of the south was probably huge. Probably a bad example though, because Dallas is one of the fastest growing cities in the country so idk. If I had to settle on any argument I'd say it was a combination of it all.
 

Wallaby Dan

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They built their houses different then. Most were "shotgun" houses that had a breezeway through the center of the house. They made use of shade trees and knew how to utilize the shade to cool the whole house.
They built our house backwards. The trees are in the backyard. The front side is open. The front side is facing south!! Tell me this wasn't a government operation...
 

Joe C

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Great Lakes State
I would say motorized vehicles helped with population growth in these areas more than AC because they were less accessible by horse and carriage. The Dallas population chart almost doubles with each "modernization" in technological enhancement.
https://worldpopulationreview.com/us-cities/dallas-tx-population

I mean, in 1880 Dallas was at 10 thousand people, which compared to the north east might be small but in terms of the south was probably huge. Probably a bad example though, because Dallas is one of the fastest growing cities in the country so idk. If I had to settle on any argument I'd say it was a combination of it all.
I agree, There are so many different factors, it is impossible to attribute it to only just one thing for the population growth in the southwest U.S. Arizona has seen an explosion in growth also
 

Wallaby Dan

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I was there in 69. Luke afb was just 20 miles west of Phoenix. I went out in 1997 and Phoenix was all around it! But trees...what trees..whats that??
 

strollin

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N. Calif.
Another factor is the humidity. Dallas is a fairly humid place while Phoenix isn't. 90 degrees with 30% humidity is much more bearable than 90 degrees with 80% humidity. When I was in the army, I spent a summer in Georgia, a summer in Korea and a summer in Kansas, all places with high humidity. I couldn't wait to get back home to Calif where the temps might be the same but the humidity was much lower.

I think the reason people are able to settle in the desert today more than in the past is access to water. There are ways to cope with the heat (AC is just one of them) but humans can't live anywhere unless they have access to water.

I'm 67 and have lived in Calif my whole life. We bought the house we're currently living in 4 years ago. It's the first house I've lived in that has AC. Never needed it in the other places we've lived but wouldn't want to live in our current location without having AC!
 

Smart_Guy

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Maybe today we are spoiled enough that we think the past was too hot to live in? It gets hot where I live too. 48C is common to see in summer. And some exceptional days reach 50C. In the old days here people used huge pots to cool water with wend which also cooled the surroundings. Not that effective but it did make a difference.
 

PP Mguire

Build Guru
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Fort Worth, Texas
Another factor is the humidity. Dallas is a fairly humid place while Phoenix isn't. 90 degrees with 30% humidity is much more bearable than 90 degrees with 80% humidity. When I was in the army, I spent a summer in Georgia, a summer in Korea and a summer in Kansas, all places with high humidity. I couldn't wait to get back home to Calif where the temps might be the same but the humidity was much lower.

I think the reason people are able to settle in the desert today more than in the past is access to water. There are ways to cope with the heat (AC is just one of them) but humans can't live anywhere unless they have access to water.

I'm 67 and have lived in Calif my whole life. We bought the house we're currently living in 4 years ago. It's the first house I've lived in that has AC. Never needed it in the other places we've lived but wouldn't want to live in our current location without having AC!
I thought our humidity was bad until I went to Florida. The instant I got out of that car I was soaked with sweat. Unbearable place.
 

strollin

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Yeah, same as Georgia. I have vivid memories of my time in the army when I was stationed in Georgia, standing in formation early in the morning with sweat running down my back.
 
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