Overclocking E8500 (Temp, Multi)

canucks63

In Runtime
Messages
137
I've spent the last few days trying to overclock my E8500 on my Biostar I45. The CPU is under a Xigmatek 1286 with crappy push pins. I haven't got around getting the bolt through kit, and I'm not sure high secure these push pins are right now (bent one of the pin tips and had to bend it back). Right now, I'm at 3915 Mhz (460MHz*8.5x) at 1.285V running Prime95 15 minutes stable (still going). The temperature is maxing at 59C. Is this too high? I know it may be within the limits of the CPU but will it degrade the processor, or is it safe enough? I'm looking to get 4Ghz, so thats why I'm wondering.

I've been reading around a few places, and some places say that lowering the multi and raising the FSB will actually decrease real world performance, and I was wondering if there is any truth to this. I want the most out of memory and my CPU.

 

rohan23

Fully Optimized
Messages
4,087
Those temps are perfectly acceptable. You really won't lose any performance. I've heard people say you get a more stable overclock with a lower multiplier.
 

A True Folder

Fully Optimized
Messages
2,789
Try 500*8.

Temps are well within the safe zone, I prefer Real Temp though.

Excessive voltage is the biggest cause of degradation, at 1.288V you're fine, just stay under 1.40V as a rule of thumb for 45nm cpu's using aircooling.
 

worshipme

Golden Master
Messages
5,603
I've been reading around a few places, and some places say that lowering the multi and raising the FSB will actually decrease real world performance, and I was wondering if there is any truth to this. I want the most out of memory and my CPU.
No, it's actually the complete opposite. Higher FSB = more bandwidth between the CPU and RAM meaning you can run the RAM at faster speeds.
However, the higher the FSB, the more stress is placed on the north bridge meaning that you will often have to settle for a lower FSB and a higher multiplier to achieve stability rather than a lower multiplier and a higher FSB.
Ex: 500x8=4000MHz 400x10=4000MHz. A 500MHz FSB speed places a lot more strain on the north bridge and may not be stable compared to a 400MHz FSB. TBH, the performance difference between 400x10 and 500x8 is going to negligible. I recommend you use the 9.5x multi available to you.

And your temps are good. The E8500's max temp is 72c, so anything under that at full load is safe.

To add to ATF's comment about the voltages and degradation, I recommend you pay the most attention to the FSB or VVT voltage as this seems to be having the most affect on the 45nm C2D's lifespan. Do not exceed 1.2V.
 
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