Network Cabling

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Gscope

Baseband Member
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Hi

Im currently going to get a 50 ft + network cord to extend from a router to a server in my home.

So I went to newegg.com to look for one. Something I really never considered is the difference and the compatibility with a network. Such as CAT 5 CAT 5e CAT 5e Crossover and CAT 6.

To as much as I know... I have faint clue that each of those are determined by speed? Which would be best for that long distance?

and by "Crossover" what does it mean.


I just need to really know the difference between those and which one I should go with and if they would all work in a normal home based network/server.
 

EricB

Chillin Techie
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cat5 = 100 mbps
cat5e = 350 mbps
cat6 = 1000 mbps

crossover = will uplink your router or nic to a hub, making the hub essentially a router
 

mikesgroovin

HONK if you route packets
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Cat5 vs Cat5e vs CAT6 have nothing to do with speeds.
You can achieve 1000mbps with CAT5e.....thats mainly what is was developed for. The main difference is bandwidth extention from 100MHz to 200MHz (5e to 6). The cabling is improved so that the signal-to-noice ratio decreases as well as crosstalk. This will ultimately increate performance and reliability.....but it has nothing to do with speed. 5e can achieve 1000mbps.
 

EricB

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mikesgroovin said:
Cat5 vs Cat5e vs CAT6 have nothing to do with speeds.
You can achieve 1000mbps with CAT5e.....thats mainly what is was developed for. The main difference is bandwidth extention from 100MHz to 200MHz (5e to 6). The cabling is improved so that the signal-to-noice ratio decreases as well as crosstalk. This will ultimately increate performance and reliability.....but it has nothing to do with speed. 5e can achieve 1000mbps.

that's what I was told. I believe you though as you seem to to be the king of networking.
 

Ethereal_Dragon

Fully Optimized
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All a cross over cable does is switches the wires between the ends.... 1 end will be TIA/EIA 568A the other will be TIA/EIA 568B... This makes it so that when you connect 2 LIKE DEVICES, the pairs are flipped so that they can successfully communicate. If you have 2 PC's connected with an ethernet cable, you would need a crossover cable. If you use a straight-through cable, PC1 will be transmitting on the SAME PAIRS as PC2. Similarly, they will BOTH be RECEIVING on the same pairs. The crossover makes it so that PC1's transmit goes to PC2's recieve, and PC2's transmit goes to PC1's recieve....

Cross over have NOTHING to do with HOW a device functions... a hub is a hub, and that is ALL it will ever be.

Hub (repeater) - Layer 1
Switch (bridge) - Layer 2
Router - Layer 3
 
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