Help defining TCP/IP

Benj94

Solid State Member
Messages
6
Location
United Kingdom
I am trying to create a brief description or definition on TCP/IP and how it works. Here is what I have so far:

TCP/IP is a protocol suite that allows computers to communicate over networks. When information needs to be transferred from one node to another, TCP fragments the data into packets and assigns a number to the packets so that it can be recognised. Once the receiver node receives the data, it will reassemble the data according to the order of the numbers. The IP protocol is responsible for routing the packets to where they need to go. The IP protocol will assign an address to each packet, so that the router knows where these packets should be routed to. Each gateway computer on the network will check the addresses to see where to forward to data to. IP will always try to find the shortest route to the receiver node and is also capable of finding alternate routes if there is congestion on the initial route.
Is my understanding of TCP/IP correct? Also, is there anything else that should be added or mentioned? I am going to be applying for a job that requires a working knowledge of TCP/IP, and while I believe I understand what the protocol suite does, I am having problems summarising it.

Any help would be appreciated!
 

~Darkseeker~

Fully Optimized
Messages
2,494
Location
Welwyn Garden City, United Kingdom
at a higher level you could talk about the relationship between ethernet frames and IP packets, and the further relationship with ARP and MAC addresses.

TCP is what you call a three-way handshake protocol, setting it apart from UDP. Whereas TCP communicates to the recieving host which in turn sends a confirmation of that communication before transmission starts. UDP doesn't do this and just sends the packets to the recieving host without confirming that it exists or is online.
 

Benj94

Solid State Member
Messages
6
Location
United Kingdom
at a higher level you could talk about the relationship between ethernet frames and IP packets, and the further relationship with ARP and MAC addresses.

TCP is what you call a three-way handshake protocol, setting it apart from UDP. Whereas TCP communicates to the recieving host which in turn sends a confirmation of that communication before transmission starts. UDP doesn't do this and just sends the packets to the recieving host without confirming that it exists or is online.
Thanks for your help Darkseeker and also thanks for the help with definition of DHCP.

With TCP/IP i'm still struggling. I am basically just trying to define it in a basic manor as I know that on a test I am about to sit, I will be asked 'What is TCP/IP?' I'll also be asked about the three-way handshake later on in the test but i'll get to that later.

I don't feel as though my definition of TCP/IP is quite up to scratch. Would you agree?
 

~Darkseeker~

Fully Optimized
Messages
2,494
Location
Welwyn Garden City, United Kingdom
Thanks for your help Darkseeker and also thanks for the help with definition of DHCP.

With TCP/IP i'm still struggling. I am basically just trying to define it in a basic manor as I know that on a test I am about to sit, I will be asked 'What is TCP/IP?' I'll also be asked about the three-way handshake later on in the test but i'll get to that later.

I don't feel as though my definition of TCP/IP is quite up to scratch. Would you agree?
I think your definition is accurate, how specific and detailed you need to be needs to be tailored to the exam you're sitting. What kind of level is the test?
 

Benj94

Solid State Member
Messages
6
Location
United Kingdom
I think your definition is accurate, how specific and detailed you need to be needs to be tailored to the exam you're sitting. What kind of level is the test?
The definition does not have to be incredibly specific, I just think TCP/IP is one of the harder things to get your head around and I'm going to have to have a solid understanding of the protocols for when I sit the test.

I'm a 1st Line Support Technician and the test will be to see if I am suitable for a 2nd Line role. If I meet the requirements set in the test, then I'll get the interview for the job, so it's quite a big deal. I'm fully capable of being a 2nd Line Technician for my company, however passing the actual test is going to take some serious revision. Expect more of my clarification threads :cool:
 

root

Site Team
Staff member
Messages
8,181
Location
UK
Where I work information on TCP and UDP and the differences were a part of the first line exam!

What I would suggest is...

break apart TCP and IP, if you're likely to be asked about TCP then you're also likely to be asked about UDP.

If the idea is that you're going to be asked about TCP/IP networking then get some knowledge on networking more in general.

So start with the OSI model.
You don't really need it memorised. but understand that the IP address exists at the network layer (3)

and that TCP is the transmission control protocol and exists at the next layer up -transport layer(4)


You need to understand that TCP is transmission control protocol.

you need to understand how it controls flow,
that there is a handshake that machines which communicate must go through,
you should be able to describe that hand shake, in terms like syn, syn-ack, ack-ack

and communication won't occur until the sending machine knows that the client machine is ready.



on the other hand the UDP (User datagram protocol) has no transmission control.
data is sent from the machine, and there is no connection established as such, the sending just starts, it is used in situations where you don't necessarily care if the end machine gets the data.


Whilst you're looking at networking, think about state-full and stateless firewalls.

Basically, you won't really need to display detailed knowledge, just an overall good understanding.
 
Top