First time build for college student (newb alert)

Rhogeist

Solid State Member
Messages
11
Hey guys

My Dell E1505, which I've had for 3 years keeps blue screening, freezing up, giving me tons of problems. It might be time to get a new computer.

I'm leaning in the direction of purchasing a desktop. Portability isn't really necessary for me AFAIK, and the added power appeals to me. Also, I'd like the possibility of running WoW (not currently a player) or COD. Things like that. Basic college stuff and maybe a few games. I'd err on the side of buying too much computer, personally.

I've been searching New Egg's gamer PC lineup, and to my untrained eyes (I don't know much about computers) the prices look great.

My basic needs are as follows:

- Fast, I hate anything slow
- Enough space on the hard drive for school work (I don't edit images,
- download movies etc), but 500GB sounds about right.
- basic software (Office), lack of bloatware
- with wireless card
- I'd probably also like to find good speakers...I love good sound

My laptop was 1.6ghz 1gb RAM 120 SATA hardrive, so pretty much anything performance wise will be an improvement.

Can anybody help me out with beginning this? I don't know the first thing about building a computer.

Would it be better simply to purchase from a dealer, with everything assembled? How much assembly would be required with a PC purchased from New Egg or other such retailers?

My desired price range is ~$800.

thanks so much, and I hope I can learn something!
 

sniperviper21

Golden Master
Messages
5,452
Location
USA
Much cheeper to order off new egg then to buy from a PC dealer by far.


what kinda Processor would u want?

AMD/INTEL?

were do u live?

do u want to max out COD and WoW?
 

Rhogeist

Solid State Member
Messages
11
Much cheeper to order off new egg then to buy from a PC dealer by far.


what kinda Processor would u want?

AMD/INTEL?

were do u live?

do u want to max out COD and WoW?
processor doesn't matter for me, as long as it's fast. I don't know enough about different processors to be picky.

I'm in the DC area, and I dont want to max out, just play without hitches.

thanks for the help!
 

Szat

Daemon Poster
Messages
625
Location
United States
I stopped playing WoW when I went to college. There was just too much to do and so many people to meet. For budget I'd go with an Dual Core AMD machine like this one. and a GPU like this one.
Motherboard.
RAM
Hard Drive
DVD Drive
Power Supply

The case is all up to you, but make sure the form factor is ATX. The ATX form factor has to be congruent with what the mobo/psu is.
I'm thinking with these parts it'll cost you about $500. Since you will be a student there is a great deal for Microsoft Office 2007 Ultimate. You can get it for $60! check it out!
 

Rhogeist

Solid State Member
Messages
11
I stopped playing WoW when I went to college. There was just too much to do and so many people to meet. For budget I'd go with an Dual Core AMD machine like this one. and a GPU like this one.
Motherboard.
RAM
Hard Drive
DVD Drive
Power Supply

The case is all up to you, but make sure the form factor is ATX. The ATX form factor has to be congruent with what the mobo/psu is.
I'm thinking with these parts it'll cost you about $500. Since you will be a student there is a great deal for Microsoft Office 2007 Ultimate. You can get it for $60! check it out!
Szat,

thanks for all those links. I know the dangers of WoW, trust me ;) I was just using it as an example of the requirements I'd need.


For someone who knows nothing more than the basics about computers, how difficult would this be to assemble? I'm somewhat inclined to go for something pre-assembled, because I know at least I (probably) can't screw it up then.

Also, would 2GB of RAM be enough? RAM is pretty cheap so I wouldnt mind getting 6GB or whatever. How do you determine how much RAM you'll need? I ask this because I like to run many programs at once, especially with my browser.

thanks again, I'm learning
 

Whyfly??

Daemon Poster
Messages
976
Szat,

thanks for all those links. I know the dangers of WoW, trust me ;) I was just using it as an example of the requirements I'd need.
Doubt you'll have time for Wow in college :D

For someone who knows nothing more than the basics about computers, how difficult would this be to assemble? I'm somewhat inclined to go for something pre-assembled, because I know at least I (probably) can't screw it up then.

Not really hard. Basic rule of thumb, if it ain't going in, don't force it, try the other way. It's not hard if you take your time and be careful. Plus it is a great learning experience.

Also, would 2GB of RAM be enough? RAM is pretty cheap so I wouldnt mind getting 6GB or whatever. How do you determine how much RAM you'll need? I ask this because I like to run many programs at once, especially with my browser.
Two gigs is enough for the average user. 4-6 for a gamer, and anything about that is for editors and serious power-crunching. The only way to determine is what you will be doing with the computer. Plus there is many kinds of RAM, so get the one your motherboard supports. (You find this out by finding the RAM standard spec on the motherboard, and buying RAM with the same number)

thanks again, I'm learning
:)
 

Szat

Daemon Poster
Messages
625
Location
United States
Building your own system is a lot of fun, but you want to do some reading up on which parts are compatible. The easiest part is the actual assembly and the hardest is getting all your components to be compatible. There are guides on how to assemble computers and all of us here will help you as well. The first system I built from scratch is the one in my sig and since then I"ve assembled over 100 systems (for friends, work, school). I went from installing RAM and sound cards to building a system with ease.
 

GibsonSGKing

Daemon Poster
Messages
1,384
It's about as difficult as putting legos together. Seriously. As long as you know where stuff goes, and you aren't in a huge rush, you'll be fine. Find the first pin on processor, put it in socket. Pull the pin back down to clamp it in. Put heatsink on top of it. put motherboard shield in case. Mount motherboard. Mount PSU. install drives/hdd's. put in video card. connect front panel of case to motherboard. connect sata/ide to drives. Connect power to everything. turn it on.

Not really hard. Basic rule of thumb, if it ain't going in, don't force it, try the other way. It's not hard if you take your time and be careful. Plus it is a great learning experience.
I disagree with this to some extent. My ram really needed some pressure to click in right, but it's definitely in how it's supposed to be.
 

Whyfly??

Daemon Poster
Messages
976
I disagree with this to some extent. My ram really needed some pressure to click in right, but it's definitely in how it's supposed to be.
Yeah good point, forgot to go into detail and say RAM doesn't really apply, but for everything else, it applies. (Mostly)
 

Rhogeist

Solid State Member
Messages
11
It's about as difficult as putting legos together. Seriously. As long as you know where stuff goes, and you aren't in a huge rush, you'll be fine. Find the first pin on processor, put it in socket. Pull the pin back down to clamp it in. Put heatsink on top of it. put motherboard shield in case. Mount motherboard. Mount PSU. install drives/hdd's. put in video card. connect front panel of case to motherboard. connect sata/ide to drives. Connect power to everything. turn it on.
That sounds actually kind of fun. I'd probably like to get this done within the next 2 weeks...Junior year starts soon. :eek:

Otherwise, how does everyone think this one looks?: http://www.tigerdirect.ca/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=4326937&CatId=2629

5 sec boot time? Wow.
 
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