Concept car?

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Juice Daddy

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Aerodynamics

Every modern golf ball has dimples; their purpose is to increase and shape the lift and drag forces by modifying the behavior of the boundary layer. It should be noted that drag and lift forces exist also on smooth balls: they are only modified, not created, by dimples.

One effect of dimples is a reduction of drag, contributing to the increased length of flight of dimpled balls compared with smooth ones.

so... with that in mind...

what If a car such as a:

was covered in small dimples

would that increase mpg, speed, etc...

any thoughts?
 

aliasaid

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not sure how that works exactly, but i assume it only works for the golf ball because its completely round and its small. you see in the commercials how they test out drag using some sort of pressurised air comin from some sort of hose or something... i would think that if a car had dimples, the air wouldn't just glide over it, it would be caught in the dimples. the beetle isn't perfectly semi-circle, if it was, then maybe hte same logic will work as the golf ball...

conclusion: i hate you
 

Eagleboy

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aliasaid said:
not sure how that works exactly, but i assume it only works for the golf ball because its completely round and its small. you see in the commercials how they test out drag using some sort of pressurised air comin from some sort of hose or something... i would think that if a car had dimples, the air wouldn't just glide over it, it would be caught in the dimples. the beetle isn't perfectly semi-circle, if it was, then maybe hte same logic will work as the golf ball...

conclusion: i hate you

Nope: High-end cycling clothing shares the same dimples. Although, I believe the dimples are in the rear of the rider to cut down on pulling resistance, and smooth fabric is in the front of the rider.

I believe... If I get out of this lazy mood I'll research some sources on this.
 

Tox1cThreat

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hahah just hit a bunch of golf balls at the car and give it dimples.


I dont think that the dimples will necessarily help, in a car you want stability control. if dimples (on the underside) will give you lift then your raising off the ground a bit which wouldnt help your stability (center of gravity).

beisdes it just looking even worse that it does already....
 

Eagleboy

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Tox1cThreat said:
hahah just hit a bunch of golf balls at the car and give it dimples.


I dont think that the dimples will necessarily help, in a car you want stability control. if dimples (on the underside) will give you lift then your raising off the ground a bit which wouldnt help your stability (center of gravity).

The point would be to put dimples in the REAR of the car, not the underside. The dimples pull air in towards them, eliminating (or trying to, at least) negative air pressure - which adds resistance to the foward movement of the vehicle.


If the negative air pressure in the rear of the car is reduced, there will be less drag. The reason why golf balls have these dimples everywhere is because

a. The ball rotates in every direction, thus creating no physical "rear" or "underside". There is simply ball.
b. You want dimples on the under-side, to create not necessarily lift, but rather a reduction in umm... anti-lift? Negative air pockets on the under-side would essentially pull the ball down in a vacuum effect, so you would want to reduce this effect.





I think.
 

curtcheese64

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If I'm not mistaken I believe that certain Lexus models have a dimpled panel on the underside of the car to reduce drag.
 

john3

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why would u want to do this to a beetle? its not used for racing or anything, now maybe on the back of an enzo, that would be something.
 
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