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Old 08-18-2003, 08:44 AM   #1 (permalink)
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Question win 98 shut down issue

I have a question. I am working on a system that is running windows 98. On shut down the system automatically reboots itself. I have tried several things to solve the problem:

1. The hd has been formatted and a fresh install of the operating system has been performed.

2. Fast shut down has been disabled.

3. power scheme has been set to home/ office

4. I tried restoring to an earlier point but that did not have good results and so i ended up formatting hd again and resinstalling windows 98.

Any suggestions or advice would be greatly appreciated.
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Old 08-18-2003, 05:07 PM   #2 (permalink)
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Default still not working

I went to the microsoft site and did the steps provided and the system still does not shut down.

I have exhausted all of the ideas that i have any other suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
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Old 08-18-2003, 05:11 PM   #3 (permalink)
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I know it sounds simple, but have you downloaded all possible windows updates?
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Old 08-19-2003, 02:19 AM   #4 (permalink)
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i say torch 98 and get XP
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Old 08-19-2003, 04:20 AM   #5 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally posted by apokalipse
i say torch 98 and get XP
hmm....not really an advice...you can consider it if you have the option to buy XP.

i say this problem has a work around. system specs, would greatly help.
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Old 08-19-2003, 08:18 AM   #6 (permalink)
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system specs:

BOM for : eTower 400ix
Part Category Description Part Number
FDD Model: FDD Samsung SFD-321B 559
Keyboard Model: KB Chicony 2971 Standard 566
Mouse: Mouse Logitech M-SAS51 MSEM571LOG51
Speaker: Speaker 2.5Wx2 Samsung SP-12 570
Modem: Modem w/ Conexant Chipset 232
MB: M/B Florida-TG 1017
Power Supply: PS ILSAN ISP-120S, 120Watts 944
HDD: HDD 6.4GB EIDE Hard Drive 3.5" 1174
Prim CD Model: CDD 40X CD-ROM Samsung SC-140 1031
Memory: RAM SD-64MB PC100 1315
CPU: CPU Intel Celeron 400MHz CPEMIN107287
Audio: CS4280 3D PCI Built-In
Video: ATI Rage Pro Turbo 2X AGP w/4MB Built-In
CPU Fan Type: pga 370 - cpu fan 947
FDD Button: 107463 for FDD SFD-321B/K, ivory, Fiat bezel


I was given the system to fix up to give away to a child that can not afford a pc. the only upgrade that was done was adding a iomega zip cd 650. I disconnected the cd and removed the drivers just to rule out that it was the problem.. crappy emachine grrrrrrrrr.
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Old 08-19-2003, 08:19 AM   #7 (permalink)
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tried to add more ram just in case it was a ram issue but the system would not recognize new ram and when installed would not even boot windows so i removed it.
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Old 08-19-2003, 01:45 PM   #8 (permalink)
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looks like an old system,..for now,..you should check for physical defects especially on the mobo(leaks, etc).

also try shutting down on safe mode. if this works,..chances are...you have driver problems.

so far here's what i found on the web(www.experts-exchange.com)...looks promising.


THIRTEEN STEPS TO TROUBLESHOOTING WINDOWS SHUTDOWN OR OR RESTART PROBLEMS
(Ver. 1.0)

One of the most common areas of questions/complaints by Windows users
involves problems with shutting down Windows. The following article is based
on many sources, but especially articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base,
and input over many months from individuals on the Microsoft peer support
newsgroups. The present writer should not get credit as anything but an
editor and compiler.

Shutdown problems in Windows 95 and 98 can be caused by many factors,
including (but not limited to an incompatible, damaged, or conflicting
device driver, a damaged exit sound file, incorrectly configured or damaged
hardware, conflicting programs running, or other factors. The purpose of
this article is to systemmatically rule out each of these in turn.

The first set of recommendations all pertain to the question of Windows not
shutting down correctly. Near the end, offset by a new highlighted header,
are notes on other shutdown or restart problems.


FIRST STEP: DISABLE FAST SHUTDOWN
Skip this step if you are using Windows 95.

In Windows 98, click Start | Run (or, on an expanded feature keyboard, type
Win+R). Type MSCONFIG. Click OK. When the program comes up, click Advanced.
Make sure there is a check mark in the box next to "Disable fast shutdown."
Click OK, then OK again. Reboot the computer if you made a change.

Note that in Windows 98 Second Edition (Win98 SE), Fast Shutdown is disabled
as the default, so you are more likely to find this box already checked.

This will solve the problem in most instances.

If this doesn't solve the problem, go to the next step.


SECOND STEP: STARTUP/SHUTDOWN TROUBLESHOOTING WIZARD

Microsoft has an online Startup/Shutdown Troubleshooting Wizard at:
http://support.microsoft.com/support/tshoot/default.asp

You may want to try this as your next option; or you might want to proceed
with the manual steps following.


THIRD STEP: RULE OUT PROGRAMS LOADED FROM STARTUP FOLDER

You should restart Windows without any of the programs in your Startup
folder loading. There are several ways to do this.

(a) In Win98, go back into MSCONFIG as above. Click Selective Startup.
Remove the checkmark from in front of "Load startup group items." (NOTE:
Unlike the method given next, this removes not only Startup folder items,
but also items loading from the Registry.)

(b) In Win95, restart the computer. Press the SHIFT key until Windows 95
loads. (This is best to use only for Win95, because it doesn't work as well
in some Win98 installations.)

After doing this, click Start | Shut Down | Shut Down the Computer, then
click on Yes. Wait three minutes for Windows to shut down. If Windows shuts
down properly and does *not* hang, a program being loaded in the Startup
folder may be causing the problem. (If Windows still does not shut down
correctly, go to the FOURTH STEP below.)

To determine which program is causing the shutdown problem, rule them out
one by one, by one of the following methods:

(a) In Win98, launch MSCONFIG as above, click the Startup tab, and click to
place a checkmark in the box next to the first program item listed. Click
OK, then OK. (You will repeat this for each item in turn as you progress
through your troubleshooting.)

(b) In Win 95, you have to manually remove the icons from the Startup folder
one at a time. To do so, right click on the Start button, select Explore,
click on the + sign next to Programs in the left-hand pane, then click on
the Startup folder. Drag all icons (except one) from the Startup folder (in
the right-hand pane) to the Programs folder (in the left-hand pane), then
restart the computer.

After doing this, click Start | Shut Down | Shut Down the Computer, etc. as
before. Wait as before for Windows to shut down. If Windows shuts down
properly and does *not* hang, then the program you left in the Startup
folder is not causing the problem.

Repeat the above steps, clicking on the Programs folder instead of the
Startup folder, and in each case dragging *one* of your startup program
icons from the Programs folder back to the Startup folder. In each case,
restart Windows after doing this, and, when it comes back up, shut Windows
down a second time to test it. Repeat until you find the problem file.
(NOTE: There may be more than one.)

Once the program causing the shutdown problem has been identified, contact
the program's manufacturer for assistance, or ask for online help on the
Microsoft peer support newsgroups.


FOURTH STEP: RULE OUT WIN.INI COMMAND LINE PROBLEMS

Identify any LOAD= or RUN= lines in the file WIN.INI. To do this, use one of
the following methods:

(a) In Win98, launch MSCONFIG as before. Click on the Win.ini tab. Click the
+ next to [windows] and look for any lines beginning with LOAD= or RUN=.
Click to remove the check mark in front of each of these that you may find.
Click OK to exit MSCONFIG.

(b) In Win95, click the Start | Run, type SYSEDIT, then click OK. Click on
the WIN.INI window. (Maximize this window and SysEdit itself if you prefer.)
Look for any lines beginning with LOAD= or RUN=. Place a semicolon ( at
the beginning of each of these line. Save the changes to the WIN.INI file,
then exit SYSEDIT.

Restart Windows. Then shut down Windows and wait, as before, for Windows to
shut down.

If Windows 95 does *not* hang during shutdown, the problem may be caused by
a program being loaded from the "LOAD=" or "RUN=" line in the WIN.INI file.
To determine which program is causing the problem, re-enable them one at a
time by reversing the steps done immediately above (in Win98, adding back
the check mark in MSCONFIG, or in Win95, removing the semicolon in SYSEDIT).
In between each program you re-enable, restart Windows, then shut it down to
see if it shuts down correctly.

Once the program line causing the shutdown problem has been identified,
contact the program's manufacturer for assistance, or ask for online help on
the Microsoft peer support newsgroups.


FIFTH STEP: RULE OUT AUTOEXEC.BAT OR CONFIG.SYS COMMAND LINE PROBLEMS

Restart Windows. Bring up the Boot Menu by one of the following means:

(a) In Win98, press the Ctrl key as your computer starts up, holding it
until the Boot Menu appears.

(b) In Win95, as soon as the message "Starting Windows 95" appears, press
and hold the F8 key.

Choose Step-By-Step Confirmation from the Boot Menu. Press Y at each of the
following prompts. Press N for any other prompts:

- Load Doublespace driver
- Process the system registry
- DEVICE=C:\WINDOWS\HIMEM.SYS
- DEVICE=C:\WINDOWS\IFSHLP.SYS
- Load the Windows graphical user interface
- Load all Windows drivers

After Windows finishes loading, shut down Windows and wait, as before, for
Windows to shut down. If Windows shuts down properly, the problem may be
caused by a command line in the AUTOEXEC.BAT or CONFIG.SYS file.

To determine which line is causing the problem, follow these steps: Restart
Windows, and bring up the Boot Menu as before. Press Y for each of the
prompts listed above, plus one *additional* command. Press N for all other
prompts. (You will cycle through the additional lines, selecting a
*different* additional command each time until you have gone through them
all.) Each time, after Windows finishes loading, shut down Windows and wait
for it to shut down. Repeat the above until the shutdown problem occurs.

When the shutdown problem occurs, you have identified the command causing
the problem. Edit the file containing the command (using SYSEDIT as above
or, in Win98, MSCONFIG to remove the checkmark in front of the problemmatic
item) and disable the command.


SIXTH STEP: RULE OUT EMM386-RELATED MEMORY CONFLICTS

Rule out the problem being caused by a memory conflict that sometimes exists
when Emm386.exe is not loaded from the Config.sys file.

To do this, launch SYSEDIT as above. Click the Config.sys window. In the
CONFIG.SYS file, make sure the following lines exist in this order:

device=c:\windows\himem.sys
device=c:\windows\emm386.exe noems x=a000-f7ff

Save the CONFIG.SYS file, then quit SYSEDIT. Restart the computer. When
Windows is again loaded, shut down Windows and wait for Windows to shut down
as before.

If Windows 95 shuts down properly, the problem may be caused by a memory
conflict that sometimes exists when Emm386.exe is not loaded from the
CONFIG.SYS file. For information about determining the exact location of the
memory conflict, please see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge
Base article:
"Locating and Excluding RAM/ROM Addresses in the UMA"
http://support.microsoft.com/support.../Q112/8/16.asp


SEVENTH STEP: RULE OUT VIRTUAL DEVICE DRIVER / SYSTEM.INI PROBLEMS

Rule out the problem being caused by a virtual device driver being loaded
from the SYSTEM.INI file.

To do this, repeat the FOURTH STEP but with the SYSTEM.INI file instead of
the WIN.INI file. Instead of looking for LOAD= and RUN= lines, examine the
section [386Enh] and place a semicolon ( at the beginning of each line
(Win95) or remove the check mark in front of each line (Win98) that begins
with "DEVICE=" and ends with ".386". Carry out all other steps as in the
FOURTH STEP.

Should this step identify a virtual device driver causing the problem,
contact the driver's manufacturer for assistance, or ask for online help on
the Microsoft peer support newsgroups.


EIGHTH STEP: RULE OUT DAMAGED EXIT SOUND FILE

In Control Panel, double-click Sounds. In the Events box, click Exit
Windows. In the Name box, click None. Click OK. Shut down Windows, and wait
for Windows to shut down as before.

If Windows does not hang during the shut down process, the problem may be
caused by a damaged exit sound file. To double-check this, restore the same
sound as before, shut down Windows etc., and see if the problem is restored.
If you confirm that this is the problem, restore the sound file from a
backup or from your Windows CD or diskettes, or reinstall the third party
program that provided the sound file.


NINTH STEP: RULE OUT ADVANCED POWER MANAGEMENT (APM) PROBLEMS

NOTE: Not all computers have APM features. If your computer does not have
APM features, skip this step and go onto the TENTH STEP below.

Right click on the My Computer icon and select Properties. Click the Device
Manager tab. Double-click the System Devices branch to expand it.
Double-click Advanced Power Management in the device list, click the
Settings tab, and then click the Enable Power Management check box to clear
it. Click OK until you return to Control Panel. Restart Windows.

When Windows is fully loaded, shut down Windows and wait for Windows to shut
down as before. If Windows shuts down properly, the problem may be caused by
APM. Contact the computer's manufacturer for assistance.

NOTE: For additional information about shutdown problems with APM enabled,
please see the following Microsoft Knowledge Base article:
"Shutdown Hangs After 'Please Wait While...' Screen"
http://support.microsoft.com/support.../Q136/6/51.asp


TENTH STEP: RULE OUT WINDOWS FILE SYSTEM SETTINGS

Right click on the My Computer icon and select Properties. Click the
Performance tab. Click File System. Click the Troubleshooting tab. Click all
the check boxes to select them. Click OK, click Close, and then click Yes.
Restart Windows.

When Windows is fully loaded, Shut down Windows and wait for Windows to shut
down as before. If Windows shuts down properly, the problem is related to
the File System settings. Each of these boxes can be unchecked one at a time
and the rebooting-then-shutdown cycle repeated to identify which is/are
relevant.


ELEVENTH STEP: RULE OUT WINDOWS DEVICE DRIVER PROBLEMS

Next, rule out whether a Windows device driver is causing the shutdown
problem, or a device installed in your computer is configured incorrectly or
is not functioning properly.

Right click on the My Computer icon and select Properties. Click the
Hardware Profiles tab. Click the hardware profile that you are currently
using, and then click Copy. Type "Test Configuration" in the To box, and
then click OK. Click the Device Manager tab. Double-click any device, and
then click the Test Configuration check box to clear it. Repeat this step
until you have disabled all devices. Do not disable any system devices. When
you are prompted to restart Windows, click No. (NOTE: If you disable a PCI
hard disk controller, choose Yes to restart Windows. PCI hard disk
controllers cannot be unloaded dynamically.)

Restart Windows. When Windows restarts, you receive the following message:

Windows cannot determine what configuration your computer is in. Select one
of the following:

Choose Test Configuration from the list of configurations. As Windows
starts, you will receive the following error message:

Your Display Adapter is disabled. To correct the problem, click OK to open
Device Manager.

Click Cancel. When the Display Properties dialog box opens, click Cancel.
Shut down Windows, waiting a bit as usual. If Windows shuts down properly,
the problem may be caused by a Windows device driver or a device installed
in your computer that is configured incorrectly or is not functioning
properly.

To determine which device driver or device is causing the problem, go back
into Device Manager. Double-click a device that you disabled in step E
above, and then click the Test Configuration check box to select it. When
prompted to restart Windows, click Yes. When Windows has restarted, shut
down Windows, waiting a bit as usual. Repeat this with each device in turn
until the shutdown problem reoccurs. When the problem reoccurs, you have
identified the device or device driver causing the problem.

NOTE: If the shutdown problem is being caused by a Plug and Play device that
is configured incorrectly or is not functioning properly, removing the
device from the current hardware profile will correct the problem. After you
remove the device from the current hardware profile and restart Windows, the
drivers associated with the device are removed from memory and the shutdown
problem does not occur. However, as Windows starts, the Plug and Play device
will be detected automatically and installed in the current hardware
profile. When you restart Windows a second time, the drivers associated with
the device are again loaded in memory and the shutdown problem returns.

If Windows continues to hang on shutdown after you complete steps the above
steps, reinstall Windows to a different folder to rule out the possibility
of damaged files. If your computer has a Plug and Play BIOS, reinstall
Windows using the "setup /P I" command to rule out a defective Plug and Play
BIOS.

If Windows still hangs during the shutdown process after you reinstall it,
your computer may have faulty hardware or faulty system components including
RAM, the CPU, the motherboard, or an internal or external cache. Contact
your computer's manufacturer for assistance.


TWELFTH STEP: USE BOOTLOG.TXT TO IDENTIFY THE PROBLEM

If Windows still hangs during the shutdown process, after all the foregoing,
create a BOOTLOG.TXT file. To do this, bring up the Boot Menu as instructed
previously and select the option to create a boot log. Let Windows load
fully. Shut down Windows. Then restart Windows but do *not* create a new
boot log this time (otherwise it would overwrite the one you just created).

Examine C:\BOOTLOG.TXT for "Terminate=" entries. These entries are located
at the end of the file and may provide clues as to the cause of the problem.
Each "Terminate=" entry should have a matching "EndTerminate=" entry on a
successful shutdown. If the last line in the Bootlog.txt file is
"EndTerminate=KERNEL," Windows shut down successfully. If the last line in
BOOTLOG.TXT is one of the following entries, check the listed possible
cause:

Terminate=Query Drivers: Possible QEMM or other memory manager issue.
Terminate=Unload Network: Possible conflict with real-mode network driver in
the CONFIG.SYS file.
Terminate=Reset Display: Disable video shadowing. You may also need an
updated video driver.
Terminate=RIT: Possible timer-related problems with the sound card or an old
mouse driver.
Terminate=Win32: Problem with a 32-bit program blocking a thread. Possibly
Microsoft Visual C for Windows.


THIRTEENTH STEP: OTHER SOLUTIONS

If the previous steps do not resolve the problem, try resetting the
computer's CMOS settings back to the factory defaults. For information about
changing CMOS settings in your computer, please consult the computer's
documentation or manufacturer. WARNING: Before you reset the computer's CMOS
settings back to the factory defaults, make sure to write down the CMOS
settings.

Also, the PC Speaker driver (SPEAKER.DRV) can cause Windows to stop
responding at shutdown or startup. To disable the PC Speaker driver, disable
the "wave=speaker.drv" line in the SYSTEM.INI file, then restart the
computer.

On a computer with a BIOS that expects IRQ 12 to be in use by a PS/2-style
mouse port, but instead has a software-configurable hardware device (such as
a Plug and Play adapter) using IRQ 12, Windows can hang on shutdown. To work
around this problem, reserve IRQ 12 in Device Manager, or change the IRQ for
the software-configurable device in Device Manager. (You may also want to
consider upgrading the BIOS in your computer to a later version.) To reserve
an IRQ with Device Manager: In Control Panel, double-click System. On the
Device Manager tab, double-click Computer. On the Reserve Resources tab,
click the Interrupt Request (IRQ) option, and then click Add. In the Value
box, click the IRQ you want to reserve. Click OK until you return to Control
Panel.


WINDOWS WITH INTERNET EXPLORER SCENARIOS:

If you are having shutdown problems on a computer with Microsoft Internet
Explorer 4.01 and one or more network drives mapped on your computer with
the Windows Desktop Update component installed, update to Internet Explorer
5 or apply the IE4.01 Service Pack 1 from www.microsoft.com/ie/.

If Internet Explorer (any version) is installed on the computer, and your
user profile contains a large Temporary Internet Files folder (cache),
Windows can hang on shutdown. To work around this behavior, use any of the
following methods: METHOD 1: Empty your Temporary Internet Files folder each
time you quit Internet Explorer. METHOD 2: Maintain each user's temporary
Internet files in the user's Home directory. Although this still consumes
server storage, it does not require that the files be copied to the server
when users log off. METHOD 3: Maintain all users' temporary Internet files
in a shared common folder. Note that if you use this method, all user's
cookies are stored in the same location. METHOD 4: Maintain each user's
temporary Internet files on the local drive in a location other than the
user's profile folder. This is the most efficient method. However, this does
not allow a user's cookies to follow the user to other stations.


WIN98 ONLY SCENARIOS:

If you are using Cisco TCP/IP Suite 100 as your TCP/IP stack, remove Cisco
TCP/IP Suite 100, and then install Microsoft TCP/IP. (Unfortunately, Cisco
Systems no longer provides technical support for Cisco TCP/IP Suite 100.)
For step-by-step instructions in this, see the Microsoft Knowledge Base
article
http://support.microsoft.com/support.../q189/8/80.asp

If you have shutdown problems and are using Norton AntiVirus with the
Auto-Protect feature enabled, disable the Auto-Protect feature, then obtain
the latest LiveUpdate for Norton AntiVirus from Symantec's Web site.

If your computer uses Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI) and
the Fast Shutdown feature is disabled, or if your computer contains a
Matsonic BIOS and the "USB Function for DOS" option is enabled in the BIOS,
and the computer hangs at shutdown, and you may receive one or both of the
following messages: Windows is shutting down. [-OR-] It's now safe to turn
off your computer. A supported fix that corrects this problem is available
from Microsoft, but has not been fully regression tested and should be
applied only to computers experiencing this specific problem. To resolve
this problem immediately, contact Microsoft Technical Support to obtain the
fix. (See http://support.microsoft.com/support...et/default.asp for
further information on this support. See
http://support.microsoft.com/support.../q196/0/08.asp for more
details on this fix.)

SEE ALSO:
"Windows Startup and Shutdown Issues"
http://support.microsoft.com/support.../76lmg02ey.asp
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Old 08-19-2003, 01:48 PM   #9 (permalink)
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sorry if its too long. i hope this helps.
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Old 08-19-2003, 07:20 PM   #10 (permalink)
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made it all the way to step 11 and it still will not shut down. Tried to do step 11 but the directions do not match what i am experiencing on my system .. i got to making test configuration and then went to device manager to disable the item and double clicked them but no windows showed up with test configuration box to click like the directions said. Still not working ... shut down and it just restarts. I have installed all of the windows updates and still not working i even took out the ethernet card and the modem and removed the drivers and still nothing. any other ideas.. do you think it could be a faulty power supply?
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