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Old 06-16-2004, 03:55 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Default tracks on hard disk & cd rom

why does a hard disk have multiple tracks whereas a cd rom has a single track?
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Old 06-17-2004, 09:19 AM   #2 (permalink)
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i beleive its the density of the actual disk. on the hd there are numerous read/writing heads (i.e. multiple tracks) whereas on a cd its done by one laser beam
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Old 06-17-2004, 04:46 PM   #3 (permalink)
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Default Re: tracks on hard disk & cd rom

Quote:
Originally posted by rookie1010
why does a hard disk have multiple tracks whereas a cd rom has a single track?
Your assumptiong of multiple tracks vs. single tracks is wrong. There is no such thing as a 'track' on a hdd for data storage.

Data on a HDD is stored differently compared to a CD. On a HDD, data is stored on clusters. A group of clusters in turn make up a sector. A group of sectors make up the hard drive.
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Old 06-17-2004, 05:52 PM   #4 (permalink)
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CD's and Hard Drives are organized mostly in the same way.

The first subdivision of a CD/HD is a track. This is a circular area of even width. These tracks are then split up into sectors. From there sectors are organized into clusters for your OS/CDROM to access them. Typical size is 64 sectors to a cluster.

The one extra organization scheme HD's have that CD's don't are cylinders. A cylinder is a section of all of the platters in the HD accessed by the same Track.

IE Cylinder 1 is made up of Track 1 on Platter 1 + Track 2 on Platter 2..... etc.

So, I guess to answer the question in this post, CD and Hard Drives both have multiple tracks. Just think about mucis CD's. Each song is dubbed, a track (even though it's likely that the song isn't contained in a single track).
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Old 06-17-2004, 06:54 PM   #5 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally posted by bla!!
CD's and Hard Drives are organized mostly in the same way.

The one extra organization scheme HD's have that CD's don't are cylinders. A cylinder is a section of all of the platters in the HD accessed by the same Track.

IE Cylinder 1 is made up of Track 1 on Platter 1 + Track 2 on Platter 2..... etc.

So, I guess to answer the question in this post, CD and Hard Drives both have multiple tracks. Just think about mucis CD's. Each song is dubbed, a track (even though it's likely that the song isn't contained in a single track).
Bla! I was wrong in saying that HDDs don't have tracks - they do. However, CD's don't have clustors nor sectors as they do not use the same FAT/NTFS file system as hard drives do.
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Old 06-17-2004, 09:27 PM   #6 (permalink)
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Actually, the track on the CD is one long continuous spiral track, even though the seperation between the two is considered a track. Best way to look at this is here:


http://electronics.howstuffworks.com/cd2.htm
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