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Old 01-04-2005, 11:30 PM   #1 (permalink)
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I have a hard drive on my computer that only has one Folder in it. It's for all my music and it is 10.5 GB. It's a 23.68 GB HD, and says i have 10.7 GB free. I want to know where the mysterious ~7 GB has gone.
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Old 01-04-2005, 11:55 PM   #2 (permalink)
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Wouldn't it more like 2.5 gb missing? And is there a recovery partition? Some computer brands make recovery partitions automatically.
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Old 01-05-2005, 11:53 AM   #3 (permalink)
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well, it's 5.3 GB, to be exact, but that's not the point. I don't think there is a recovery partition, it's been formatted not too long ago. I've tried System Mechanic 5 and stuff like that, but it doesn't do too much
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Old 01-05-2005, 12:00 PM   #4 (permalink)
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i'd use something like fdisk or partition magic to see if you can identify wheather that space has a partition or not, and if so, try and obtain a "label" of that partition, a name. that may help, it is entirely possible that
1. when entering the size for the last format the entire drive wasn't selected for whatever reason
2. bad sectors durring previouse disk scans have ommited that portion of the drive as bad, thus it didn't get formated durring last format,
3. there was a previouse partition on that drive from another place and time that has not been deleted or released into the wild.
try that, see what you find.
good luck,
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Old 01-05-2005, 05:06 PM   #5 (permalink)
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Do you think your other 2.5 gig is probably all of your OS files?

10.5 GB. It's a 23.68 GB HD, and says i have 10.7 GB free

10.5+10.7=21.2 23.68-21.2=2.48 g

Windows xp is about 1.6 gig by itself with no programs added in
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Old 01-05-2005, 05:10 PM   #6 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally posted by plyb0y007
I have a hard drive on my computer that only has one Folder in it. It's for all my music and it is 10.5 GB. It's a 23.68 GB HD, and says i have 10.7 GB free. I want to know where the mysterious ~7 GB has gone.
sorry I read the question wrong.

empty your recycle bin or open your folder, click tools, folder options, view. check the "show hidden files and folder". maybe you have an imcomplete download folder
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Old 01-10-2005, 03:55 PM   #7 (permalink)
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Thank you all for your help. I appreciated it very much
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Old 01-10-2005, 05:10 PM   #8 (permalink)
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A good rule of thunb is to take 7% off your harddrive actually useable space. So take 23.68gb - 7%= 22.02 GB left - 10.5gb = 11.52gb - 2gb = 9.52gb left - the other junk you may have on your system like updates, cookies, TIF's, etc and it may not be partitioned correctly. Are you using XP? If so go to Start/Settings/Control Panel/Administrative Tools/Computer Management/Storage/Disk Management and see if there is a greyed in area where you hardrive is located. If so, format it and you will have the rest of your space back. I've recently done this in XP.

Here's an article I found about this matter:

It looks as though some consumers are tired of being "fooled" by hard drive manufacturers' capacity ratings of hard drives. Here's a piece on the matter at hand:

The lawsuit brought by Los Angeles residents Lanchau Dan, Adam Selkowitz, Tim Swan and John Zahabian centers around the way that computer hard drives are described by manufacturers.

Representatives of the eight defendants were not immediately available to comment.

According to the lawsuit, computer hard drive capacities are described in promotional material in decimal notation, but the computer reads and writes data to the drives in a binary system.

The result is that a hard drive described as being 20 gigabytes would actually have only 18.6 gigabytes of readable capacity, the lawsuit said.

The plaintiffs said this difference in convention is deceptive and leaves buyers with less storage than they thought they were getting when they purchased their computers.
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Old 01-10-2005, 05:30 PM   #9 (permalink)
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Welcome to the wonderful world of slack space. The issue is a numerical "faux pas". What happens is that your hard drive is measured in base-10 numerals, where 1gb=1000mb, 1mb=1000kb, and so on.

For example, a 82.3gb hard drive= 82,300,000,000 bytes.
In actuality, the drive should be measured in base-1024 numerals, where 1gb=1024mb, 1mb=1024kb and so on. This would mean that your 82.3gb drive = 88,368,952,115.2 bytes.

But as you have seen, this is not the case. The drive is approximately 82.3gb give or take a few mb's. You have "lost" some space simply because of a discrepancy between the marketing world and the real world. Also, you lose some space on the drive when you format.

Base-10 numbering is a holdover from the old days when it was easier to just label a 1gb drive as a "1gb drive". After all, the consumer only "lost" 48mb in the process.

That's not much when you think about it, right? But when you add up all those 48mb chunks across an "82.3gb" drive, you get 5.7gb of actual space that has been "lost".

It is a little confusing to some, but just remember that a drive rated in the base-10 scale will always be smaller than the advertised specs.

~ Fawks
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