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Old 06-13-2008, 06:01 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Default Is it worthwhile replacing graphic card/motherboard on a notebook?

I have 1 year old HP media center notebook. Similar notebook will cost around $1200 to $1500 these days.

Graphic card on this notebook is gone but graphic card is part of motherboard which means I need to replace motherboard to get it fixed.

I talked to tech support, and they told me it will cost $300 (part, labor, shipping) to fix this. Is it worth while to get it fixed?

It is 17" notebook which is practically immobile. After using this I now fell that probably I don't need media center notebook, perhaps I can get away with a small (14") mobile notebook and a external monitor for best of both world (mobility and home pc) for the same price. Any suggestions please.
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Old 06-13-2008, 06:32 PM   #2 (permalink)
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Default Re: Is it worthwhile replacing graphic card/motherboard on a notebook?

If you are looking for a desktop replacement, settle for no less than a dedicated video card with DVI output and no less than 4 USB ports. But $300 is cheap for a motherboard replacement. Is it worth fixing? It depends on how happy you were with its performance. Compare the specs between your HP and todays $600-$800 models. You may find there are plenty that will out perform what you have now.
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Old 06-13-2008, 06:45 PM   #3 (permalink)
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Default Re: Is it worthwhile replacing graphic card/motherboard on a notebook?

A graphics chip failure on a 1-year-old laptop is not common. Are you sure this is the problem? Did you check to see if it's covered under warranty?
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Old 06-13-2008, 06:48 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Default Re: Is it worthwhile replacing graphic card/motherboard on a notebook?

Thanks for your reply.

Actually it is 17" notebook with dedicated graphic card and even today cheapest notebook in this size with dedicated graphic card is more than $1000.

I was ok in terms of performance of this notebook but I did not like the weight once I got the book as it basically stuck in my home. Now first I have to decide whether to fix this or buy new one.
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Old 06-13-2008, 06:50 PM   #5 (permalink)
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Default Re: Is it worthwhile replacing graphic card/motherboard on a notebook?

Thanks DoubleHelix,

It is not covered under warranty. I took it to a tech. shop and that tech. told me about it that most likely it is motherboard + graphic card as they both are two in one.
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Old 06-13-2008, 07:07 PM   #6 (permalink)
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Default Re: Is it worthwhile replacing graphic card/motherboard on a notebook?

We may be able to help you if you can list the problems you are having. I'm assuming you're getting a poor display or no display at all on your lcd? Also assuming the problem isn't fixed when using an external monitor. There's probly not much we can do on that end but it's worth a shot, lots of good minds on here.

As far as it being worth it, you really don't seem to like lugging around a laptop of that size so it probably isn't. You can maybe sell the laptop as-is on ebay for a decent amount and put that towards a new smaller laptop. I used to have a heavier 15.4" myself but I've got a very slim 12.1" notebook and even though it's slowe rthe portability is amazing. I'd never go back to a big notebook.

As far as your possible new laptop, what games etc. are you interested in playing on it, if any? You can still get a decent dedicated vid card on a 14.1" laptop or even smaller. You could do something along these lines:
Newegg.com - ASUS F8 Series F8SV-A1 NoteBook Intel Core 2 Duo T7500(2.20GHz) 14" Wide XGA 1GB+TM1GB Memory 160GB HDD DVD Super Multi NVIDIA GeForce 8600M GT - Laptops / Notebooks

But it's all about what you need and what you are willing to spend. For brands I like MSI and Asus the best. They are very high quality builds, going for quality over quantity. Asus' new models look great and they have a 2-year standard as well so great if something does go bad. Most other brands only have 1 year standard.
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Old 06-13-2008, 09:12 PM   #7 (permalink)
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Default Re: Is it worthwhile replacing graphic card/motherboard on a notebook?

I never played video games on a computer but I use sometimes graphics to make presentations. I always chose computer with a dedicated video card so perhaps I will do the same this time as well.

l want to configure computer myself as I want bluetooth, N wireless card, webcam which in general either are not available in the entry level over the counter notebook at retailer or only available in high priced computers with lot of other options (like much high speed processor and softwares) which I don't need.

How much high resolution 1400 * 900 screen differs from 1200 * 800 resolution from naked eye. Similarly how much brightness difference is between glossy and antiglare screen?
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Old 06-13-2008, 09:21 PM   #8 (permalink)
 
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Default Re: Is it worthwhile replacing graphic card/motherboard on a notebook?

I have a new HP Pavilion dv9700t (desktop replacement 17") that has a T9300 (2.5GHz), 3GB RAM, 250GB HDD, 17" 1680x1050 screen, 512MB 8600M GS w/ HDMI (doubles as DVI w/ adapter cord), VGA, and TV outputs, full keyboard, integrated webcam and fingerprint reader. It's an expensive laptop in my configuration (with TV tuner and Vista Ultimate 64) but you can save some money and get it around $1200 with a lower configuration.
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Old 06-13-2008, 11:02 PM   #9 (permalink)
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Default Re: Is it worthwhile replacing graphic card/motherboard on a notebook?

Quote:
Originally Posted by naash View Post
How much high resolution 1400 * 900 screen differs from 1200 * 800 resolution from naked eye. Similarly how much brightness difference is between glossy and antiglare screen?
1200*800 for a 15.4" and 1400 * 900 for a 17" model gives me the best resolutions for the things I do. I like glossy the best but the glare on dark screens can be annoying if you have light to your back. Also the contrast between black and white is better.

Play around with Dell's configuration page to give you an idea what's goes into todays laptops. 1 year isn't too old to get the HP fixed for a backup. That will give you plenty of time to find your dream machine.
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Old 06-14-2008, 04:50 PM   #10 (permalink)
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Default Re: Is it worthwhile replacing graphic card/motherboard on a notebook?

Has any one replaced motherboard or have it replace for them in tech. shop in notebook pc?

If yes what was experience afterward? HP is only giving 90 days warranty post repair. I don't want to spend $300 and end getting a bad computer again. I tend to use my stuff very long time. In general products which survive more than 1 year last many many years for me. Just confused whether to spend $300 or not.
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