What To Look For When Buying Computer Components - Techist - Tech Forum

Go Back   Techist - Tech Forum > Computer Hardware > Monitors, Printers and Peripherals
Click Here to Login
Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 07-01-2008, 12:28 AM   #1 (permalink)
Lord Techie
 
Luke's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Fonthill, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 5,601
Send a message via AIM to Luke Send a message via MSN to Luke
Default What To Look For When Buying Computer Components

**Section 1: What to look for when buying a motherboard.

**Section 2: Cpu performance and compatibility.

**Section 3: Purchasing and performance of memory(ram)

**Section 4: What to look for when buying a PSU


**Section 5: What to look for in Video Cards

**Section 6: When buying a case

**Section 7: When Purchasing an HDD

**Section 8: When buying a sound card


**Section 9: Optical drives

**Section 10: Common Hardware and computer terminology

**Section 11: Miscellaneous



**Section 1: What to look for when buying a Motherboard**
{Written by: Luke992006}

~Compatibility~

When buying a motherboard one must take into account what ram and CPU they will be using in it.

Memory: If the motherboard is DDR2 then only ddr2 memory will fit in it. If the motherboard only supports 800 MHz memory then there is no point in buying higher because the motherboard will down clock it to what it supports. If a mobo supports 1066 it will support an under that (ex. 800, 667)

CPU: The CPU must be the same socket type as the mother board (ex. Lga775) for it to work. Also the CPU must not exceed the maximum FSB (Front Side Bus) of what the motherboard supports (ex. 1333). Also the motherboard must support the type of CPU (ex. Dual core (all new moboís support dual cores), Quad core).

~What do you plan to do with you motherboard~

If you plan for a single card solution then there is no need for an NVIDIA chipset (ex. 680i, 750i, 780i) If you plan to use two video cards in sli (scalable link interface) then you will need a motherboard with dual pcie slots (and it will need to be an NVIDIA Chipset), preferably 16x for both slots.

If you plan to use crossfire then a mobo that supports crossfire and has 2 pcie ports is what you need. If this computer is not for any major gaming but more for media then a 780g AMD mobo would be a great choice because they have the best integrated Graphics to date.

~ SLI or Crossfire your video cards?

NVIDIA has a thing called SLI that basically lets you have two video cards on one mobo working together to get the job done. ATIís version of this is called Crossfire.



~Integrated Graphics and Integrated Sound~

If youíre going to be doing some good gaming then you will most likely need a Gpu but if youíre only doing light gaming or none at all then integrated is the way to go. Integrated Graphics is incorporated into the motherboard instead of having a dedicated card for it. Seeing as Video cards have there own memory and integrated does not it draws from the system memory.

Integrated sound now-a-days is quite good. Only people who either like very high quality audio, or have money to spend on something buy a sound card. Most people can not tell the difference from integrated audio and a Sound Card.

**Section 2: CPU performance and compatibility**
{Written by: Luke992006}


~What will you be using it for?

If you will be multi-tasking a lot, then a quad core cpu would be a better choice over a dual core. If you are purely gaming then at the moment a dual core would be the better choice as not many games support four cores. This will change soon though so if you want the computer to last then a quad is the way to go.

~"What is Dual Core, and Quad core?"

Think of dual core like this. There is a pile of bricks. The dual core would have 2 "people" working to move the bricks where they needed to be moved as where a single core would have 1 "person" moving them. Therefore, the dual core would obviously get it done faster . The same goes for quad core, it would have four people instead of two. But that only applies to quad cores if the program or game utilizes all four cores.

~Popular and good performing CPUís~

For dual core the best performing CPU is the e8500. For the best bang for the buck in quad cores the q6600 is a good choice. If one is going to overclock past 3.6ghz then the q6700 would be better performing then the q6600.

~CPU Compatibility~

When buying a cpu it must not exceed the fsb (front side bus) of the motherboard it will be in (ex. If the mobo supports up to 1333fsb, you can not use a CPU that is over that). A CPU will only work in the correct socket. (If you have a lga775 cpu it will need an LgA775 socket motherboard)


**Section 3: Purchasing and performance of memory (ram)**
{Written by: Luke992006}


~ Will you be overclocking? ~

If youíre overclocking, spending money on good ram is a very good decision. There are sets for 40 bucks all the way up to 700(for ddr3).Usually the more expensive the ram is the better performing and the easier overclocking it will be But if your not over clocking, go with some value select..

~ Will you be gaming? ~

Games now-a-days are using more and more of your RAM. Donít even bother trying to game with a stick of 512 or even worse, 256. If your building a gaming rig then get at least 1 gig of ram. Preferably 2 GB or more.

~ ďWhat is better? One 1 gig stick or two 512 MB sticks?Ē

If your motherboard supports dual channel, go with two sticks. Having an odd amount of RAM sticks in a dual channel mobo wonít let the dual channeling take place. Therefore, IF your mobo supports dual channel the two 512 sticks would perform better.

~Memory (ram) Compatibility~

If your motherboard is DDR2 then DDR and DDR3 will not fit in it (only DDR2 will). If the motherboard only supports 800 MHz then there is no point in buying higher because the motherboard will down clock it to what it supports.

~Good Overclocking ram and bad Overclocking ram~
Ram that has lower timingís to begin with usually has more overclocking room. The best brands for over clocking are as follows: Crucial Ballistix, G.Skill, and OCZ. See B1gplís recommended pc components guide for more

Recommended PC Components


**Section 4: What to look for when buying a PSU**
{Written by: Ste}


~Wattage, Amperage and Rails~

What I would say is that there is virtually no difference between single and multi railed power supplies to date. However, the more 12V rails a Power supply has the cheaper it was to produce.

Single railed power supplies are usually of slightly higher quality than multi railed ones, but the difference is not noticeable.

How many amps one should have on the 12V rail is directly proportional to how expensive the tower will be.

That is to say, factoring out a monitor, keyboard, mouse, speakers, webcam and the case itself, consider the cost of the internal components, such as RAM, Motherboard, Processor, Video card or cards, How many hard drives and how many optical drives. The cheaper the total of these parts the less you need on the 12V rail, the more expensive the parts, the higher end they are, the more amps you will need. There is really no set boundary for amps, but it is always better to overestimate than it is to under estimate.

Wattage and Power, many power supplies are listed at their peak wattage, this means at maximum load the PC can only draw this much power, but some power supplies, such a PC power and cooling, list the continuous output first, which is more important, because this information tells you that under normal operation and listed temperatures, this power supply can output this much power without much if any stress. And power supplies that have a higher continuous output normally last longer.
Further more, even if someone buy a peak output power supply of say, 1100 watts, it does not mean that it always uses that amount of power, this is a common misconception, it is in fact that a Power supply will only put out what the PC requires. So in fact many do not use anywhere near the maximum output of their power supply and should not be concerned about their electric bill.

~Compatibility~

When one goes to buy a power supply, they will know if they need a server power supply or a normal desktop one. The primary difference between the two is that server power supplies are built to run 24/7 for years, and therefore in basic language have double the components of a normal desktop power supply. Anyways, the amount of connectors one would need is in line with how much they need to plug in. To do it in this fashion the power supply is the last item that should be chosen, this is because you will know how many and what types of connections you will need once you have every component picked out.

If you purchase a motherboard that requires an 8 pin a 24 pin and a one 4 pin connection, then you know that you need a power supply with AT LEAST that, but then you must also factor in connections for video cards, fans, hard drives, optical drives, LEDs or cold cathodes. So if you know the connections your motherboard needs, and then you see that you buy two video cards that each require two 6 pin PCIE connections, three SATA hard drives, eight fans and two optical drives, you now know that you need a power supply with at least four 6 pin PCIE connectors, at least three SATA HD connectors, one 8 Pin connector, one 24 Pin connector and nine 4 pin Molex connectors.

The point is very simple, have all your parts picked out first, tally up the type and number of connectors you need, then you can search for an adequate power supply.


~Modular and Non-Modular~

Modularity, it has become an ever increasing trend for power supplies to be modular or semi modular. This means that the power supply comes with many connectors, but you only need to plug in and use what you have components for. Modular power supplies add an extra connection, which adds more electrical resistance to the lines, however, since their debut the added resistance has decreased and is no longer a major concern so long as the power supply is from a reputable brand or Company. Since you don't need to use every connection provided this makes case and wire management all the easier and thus is excellent for small or cluttered cases.

~Generic PSUís~

Power supplies that come with cases are normally of low quality, HOWEVER, there are many that are acceptable, and those are listed in the Primary Power supply guide written by Ste, if a power supply is included in a case and is not mentioned in STE's guide it is a good bet that it is a piece of junk and should not be used.

http://www.techist.com/forums/f76/up...-guide-137927/



~ĒWhat about the flashy good looking PSUíS?Ē~

Power supply Aesthetics deals with the appearance of a power supply. The vast majority of power supplies make of for their poor quality and construction with flashy designs or lighting, this is to distract a customer from the fact that it is a POS. As such the majority of power supplies are junk, however there are some very cool flashy ones that are of sound construction and high quality. Such power supplies are stipulated in the power supply guide written by Ste.

In the end Much of the work has already been done for you, all the good and bad power supplies are listed in the Power supply guide..



**Section 5: What to look for in Video Cards**
{written by: Luke992006}


~Compatibility~

All of the new video cards are pcie so you will need a motherboard with a pci-e slot and one free to use one. Any GPU will work in any motherboard as long as it has the right slot type. When using two gpuís the motherboard must support it. For example, to us 2 nvidea cards in sli (scaleable Link Interface) you will need an Nvidea Chipset motherboard (ex. 680i, 750i, 780i) and preferably one with dual x16 pcie slots. When using 2 ATI GPUís you will need a motherboard that supports Cross fire (see you mother board specs to see if it supports Cross fire) you will also need 2 pcie slots that are open). All of the newer GPUĒS (some 7 series cards, all 8 and 9 series cards) will need a power cable directly to them, so before buying a new cpu, make sure that you PSU can handle the power the video card will need.


~What Resolution Will you be playing at? ~

When playing at higher resolutions itís always better to have more video memory. For example, if you are playing at 1920x1080 then a card with more memory (such as 512mb or 1gb) would perform better in most cases. At resís lower then 1680x1050 memory is less important but it still will be used and will up the performance in most cases.

~Light, Moderate, and Heavy Gaming~

IF you are going to be doing some light gaming, then an AMD 780g mobo (it has the best integrated graphics) would be a good choice, or a cheap GPU such as a 7600gt. If one is going to be doing some moderate gaming then integrated graphics and a 7600gt isnít really going to cut it. A 8600gt, 8800gs, 9600gso, 9600gt, or 8800gt 512mb would be a good choice. For the gamer who wants to play their games max(or near to max) settings and at high resís then an 8800gts 512mb, 8800gtx, 9800gx2, 9800gtx, 9800gtx+, 260, 280, 4850, or 4870 would be some good choices. See b1gplís recommended pc component guide for more information.


**Section 6: When buying a case**
{Written by: Luke992006}


~Cooling~

If your gaming you probably going to want a case with at least 2 or 3 fans. The bigger the fan the more air it will push and it will usually be quieter. An ideal option is to have a 120mm intake on the front, and a 120mm exhaust on the back to create a sort of wind tunnel that will be bringing in cool air but still getting rid of warm air.

A common mistake is having fans fighting against each other, such as having the fan on the heatsink pulling in air from the direction of the back exhaust fan. This is not good because they will always be fighting against each other and it will not cool the cpu as well as it could. The fan should be blowing threw the heat fins and out the back exhaust fan.

~Size~
You should always check the dimensions of the case for you know if your video card will fit (sometimes it wonít because the hdd rack is in the way). Also, certain heatsinks are quite large and conflict with some cases so be sure to check the dimensions of that also.

~Features~


Some features in cases are very useful, but are ultimately not needed. A removable motherboard tray makes installing the motherboard a breeze. Another nice feature is an lcd temp display which makes checking sys, cpu, and hdd temps easier. Iím not going to go threw all case features.

~Negative, Positive, and Balanced Pressure Cases ~

Positive pressure cases have more intake fanís then exhaust (usually 2 or more). Negative pressure cases have more exhaust fans then intake (again usually 2 or more). You might have guessed that Balanced Pressure cases have near the same amount of intake and exhaust fans. None of the three are much better then the other so it is up to you which you choose.


**Section 7: When Purchasing an HDD
{Written by: Luke992006}


~What does RPM have to do with Hard Drives? ~

The higher the rpm the faster the access times.

The average hdd is 7200rpm
Then raptors at 10,000 rpm
Then some sscs are at 15,000 rpm
Then you have ssdís which have no moving parts and are faster then all other HDDís but are incredibly expensive.

Inside a hard drive there is a disk(s) which spin, this is where the data is stored. The rpm of a hdd is how fast that disk is spinning.

~Is Rpm the only thing I should look for in a hard drive? ~


The answer is no. Rpm may affect access times but the cache affects it also. Take raptors for example. Most if not all raptors are 10,000rpm and have 16mb caches. If you look at the Seagate 7200.11 series they have 7200rpm but have 32mb caches. The 16 more MB cache makes up for the drive being only 7200rpm so you would not be able to tell the difference between the drives speed. Since you canít notice the difference the 32MB cache hddís is a better choice because they have more space then raptors and the speed difference is not noticeable. Most raptors only have 300GB of space when you can get a 500GB 32MB cache HDD for cheaper.

~What is all this SATA2, SATA, and IDE talk? ~

Most HDDís today use a Sata or Sata2 connection. IDE I a ribbon cable which was basically replaced by Sata because it is significantly smaller (better for cable management and air flow) and has a faster transfer rate. Now Sata2 is becoming the norm, it is the same size cable as Sata but has double the transfer rate.


**Section 8: When buying a sound card
{Written by: Luke992006}



~Do I need a sound card? ~


For the majority of people (around 80%) can not tell the difference between onboard sound and a sound card. In my opinion sound cards are for people how edit audio, are in the 10% who can tell the difference, like the highest quality sound, and hard core gamers who want the best.

~Sound Card Compatibility~

Sound cards do not need specific speakers to work, and old one will do but the main point to get a sound card is to have higher quality sound. A sound card isnít going to make your sound, sound any better on $10 speakers you picked up somewhere. Moat if not all sound cards use a pci slot so make sure you have one, and one is free before you buy one.

~Different Typeís of Sound Cards~

If you have a 7.1 sound system then you will need a sound card that supports 7.1. This usually isnít a problem because most quality sound cards out these days all support 7.1. Donít worry, a 7.1 supported sound card can still be used for any other speakers (ex 2.1, 5.1).
__________________

__________________
3770K @ 4.7 Ghz H100 Water Cooled | GTX 970 MSI Gold Edition SLI
32GB G.Skill RipJaws (Rendering/ Virtualization) | Corsair 650D | CORSAIR RM1000W w/ White Cable KIt
Samsung 850 Pro 256 GB SSD Boot | OCZ Vertex 3 240GB SSD Secondary | WD Black 1 TB | WD Green 3 TB
Server: Core i7 920 | 8GB RAM | Intel 240gb 730 SSD Boot | 3 x 2TB WD RED | Fractal R4
Luke is offline  
Old 07-01-2008, 12:29 AM   #2 (permalink)
Lord Techie
 
Luke's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Fonthill, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 5,601
Send a message via AIM to Luke Send a message via MSN to Luke
Default Re: What To Look For When Buying Computer Components

**Section 9: Optical drives **
{Written by: Luke992006}


~Different Types of Optical Drives~



CD-Rom: Only reads CD’s
CD-RW: Reads and Writes only CD’s
DVD-Rom: Only Reads DVD’s and CD’s
DVD-RW: Reads and Writes DVD’s and CD’s

~Connection/Compatibility~

All of the newer DVD-RW drives are Sata connection instead of IDE. When buying any optical drive be sure to check the connection type and make sure you have one available on your motherboard. Also if you plan to overclock a lot and want as good of air flow in your case as possible then you should buy a Sata optical drive because the cable is much smaller and easier to tuck out of sight for it will not disrupt air flow, thus maximizing the cooling.

**Section 10: Common Hardware and computer terminology**
{Written by: Luke992006}


IDE: Integrated Drive Electronics
CPU: Central Processing Unit
Sata: Serial ATA
GPU: Graphical Processing Unit
ATA: Advanced Technology Attachment
LED: Light-emitting diode
HDD: Hard Disk Drive
SSD: Solid State Drive
RPM: Rounds Per Minute
VGA: Visual Graphics array
RAM: Random Access Memory
DVI: Digital Video Interface
DDR: Double data rate
FPS:#1 Frames Per Second
#2 First Person Shooter
SLI: Scalable Link Interface
LCD: Liquid Crystal Display
Mobo: Motherboard
CRT: Cathode Ray Tube
PSU: Power Supply Unit
PCI: Peripheral Component Interconnect


**Section 11: Miscellaneous**
{Written by: Luke992006}


~Monitor response time Explained~

The Response time of a monitor is how long it takes to display what the computer is doing. This is quite important when playing fast paced FPS (first person shooters). Monitors that have a high response time will experience ghosting. An example of ghost would be you turn in a FPS and you see a blur behind a garbage can that is in front of you where is used to be on the monitor and where it is going. The lower the response time is the better, the lowest available is 2ms. I myself don’t settle for anything other then 2ms. The ms means Millisecond, So the ms response time on a monitor is how long the monitor will take to change what it is displaying.

~DVI VS. VGA And What They Are~


DVI stands for Digital Video interface, and Vga stands for Visual Graphic’s Array. DVI is digital and Vga is analog. DVI has a slight advantage over Vga by being able to produce a more vivid and clearer picture. DVI is quickly become the norm for monitors.

~Getting Rid of Unwanted Heat~


The easiest way to cool down the components in your case is to buy some fans and do some wire management. Buying a better heatsink for your CPU will cool it better (a heatsink must also match the socket type of your motherboard and cpu) You can also buy after market Gpu heatsinks. Usually it is not necessary but you can buy hdd coolers (they are just fans in cases that you place underneath your hdd’s) these methods are only really necessary when one is overclocking…stock cooling is ok for stock clocks. If you’re going to be overclocking a lot then water cooling is a good choice too cool components more then air cooling. Water cooling has its risks though; if there are any leaks the water can damage components. Water cooling is pretty much how it sounds. Water is circulated threw tubes in your computer to components (most commonly the CPU and Gpu(s)) and then it passes threw a radiator to cool down the water again.

For extreme overclockers there is another type of cooling available called Phase Change Cooling. It is quite expensive…some systems can cost up to $2000 just to cool the CPU. I am not going to go into detail about this type of cooling because it is not very common.




If there is any mistakes, or there is something that you think should be included or added let me know.
__________________

__________________
3770K @ 4.7 Ghz H100 Water Cooled | GTX 970 MSI Gold Edition SLI
32GB G.Skill RipJaws (Rendering/ Virtualization) | Corsair 650D | CORSAIR RM1000W w/ White Cable KIt
Samsung 850 Pro 256 GB SSD Boot | OCZ Vertex 3 240GB SSD Secondary | WD Black 1 TB | WD Green 3 TB
Server: Core i7 920 | 8GB RAM | Intel 240gb 730 SSD Boot | 3 x 2TB WD RED | Fractal R4
Luke is offline  
Old 07-01-2008, 01:37 AM   #3 (permalink)
Banned
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: BC, Canada
Posts: 36
Default Re: What To Look For When Buying Computer Components

oh my god, you helped me out so much here. I was so clueless about VGA and DVI, I never knew the difference. Thanks so much! I dont do any gaming as I only run an 8500GT but response time is also good to look for in a monitor.
QuadCore88 is offline  
Old 07-01-2008, 01:58 AM   #4 (permalink)
Lord Techie
 
Luke's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Fonthill, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 5,601
Send a message via AIM to Luke Send a message via MSN to Luke
Default Re: What To Look For When Buying Computer Components

^Thats great, it's already helped someone .
__________________
3770K @ 4.7 Ghz H100 Water Cooled | GTX 970 MSI Gold Edition SLI
32GB G.Skill RipJaws (Rendering/ Virtualization) | Corsair 650D | CORSAIR RM1000W w/ White Cable KIt
Samsung 850 Pro 256 GB SSD Boot | OCZ Vertex 3 240GB SSD Secondary | WD Black 1 TB | WD Green 3 TB
Server: Core i7 920 | 8GB RAM | Intel 240gb 730 SSD Boot | 3 x 2TB WD RED | Fractal R4
Luke is offline  
Old 07-01-2008, 02:03 AM   #5 (permalink)
Banned
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: BC, Canada
Posts: 36
Default Re: What To Look For When Buying Computer Components

Yes, you helped me alot! But I didn't know about DVI until about a year ago.
QuadCore88 is offline  
Old 07-04-2008, 10:35 PM   #6 (permalink)
Lord Techie
 
Luke's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Fonthill, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 5,601
Send a message via AIM to Luke Send a message via MSN to Luke
Default Re: What To Look For When Buying Computer Components

does no one have any idea of what can be added to make it better?
__________________
3770K @ 4.7 Ghz H100 Water Cooled | GTX 970 MSI Gold Edition SLI
32GB G.Skill RipJaws (Rendering/ Virtualization) | Corsair 650D | CORSAIR RM1000W w/ White Cable KIt
Samsung 850 Pro 256 GB SSD Boot | OCZ Vertex 3 240GB SSD Secondary | WD Black 1 TB | WD Green 3 TB
Server: Core i7 920 | 8GB RAM | Intel 240gb 730 SSD Boot | 3 x 2TB WD RED | Fractal R4
Luke is offline  
Old 07-04-2008, 11:47 PM   #7 (permalink)
Monster Techie
 
Chankama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Canada
Posts: 1,523
Default Re: What To Look For When Buying Computer Components

It's a lot to read. . Good start. Since someone already said something about VGA and DVI, I'll read that section first.

Quote:
Originally Posted by luke992006 View Post
~DVI VS. VGA And What They Are~

DVI stands for Digital Video interface, and Vga stands for Visual Graphic’s Array. DVI is digital and Vga is analog. DVI has a slight advantage over Vga by being able to produce a more vivid and clearer picture. DVI is quickly become the norm for monitors. A DVI port can only be found on video cards, it hasn’t been incorporated into motherboards yet, only Vga is.
I would actually say DVI has a pretty significant advantage in picture quality. If you pump a high resolution through VGA vs DVI, the effect is quite noticeable. Digital is more resistant to noise corruption.

What do you mean DVI port hasn't been incorporated into mobos yet? 780G mobos have DVI/HDMI on the mobo itself.

And take it from me, Display Port will be a huge player in in a few years. Will replace HDMI and DVI.. book it!
Chankama is offline  
Old 07-05-2008, 08:29 AM   #8 (permalink)
Lord Techie
 
Kharn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 7,638
Default Re: What To Look For When Buying Computer Components

The Abit AN-M2 HD has DVI integrated onto the mobo that needs changing luke.
__________________
Visit this and do something for the world!
www.hackersforcharity.org

Want to do even more? Take a look here and join the fight on human trafficking.

Hear and you forget, see and you remember, do and you understand.

Kharn is offline  
Old 07-05-2008, 10:35 AM   #9 (permalink)
Monster Techie
 
Chankama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Canada
Posts: 1,523
Default Re: What To Look For When Buying Computer Components

Quote:

If you plan for a single card solution then there is no need for an NVIDIA chipset (ex. 680i, 750i, 780i) If you plan to use two video cards in sli (scalable link interface) then you will need a motherboard with dual pcie slots (and it will need to be an NVIDIA Chipset), preferably 16x for both slots.

If you plan to use crossfire then a mobo that supports crossfire and has 2 pcie ports is what you need. If this computer is not for any major gaming but more for media then a 780g AMD mobo would be a great choice because they have the best integrated Graphics to date.
These two paragraphs should be worded better. When I read it, I feel like there is an unusual emphasis on NVIDIA. Even if the person wants to only deal with ATI/AMD products.
Chankama is offline  
Old 07-05-2008, 12:38 PM   #10 (permalink)
Mod Emeritus
 
Puddle Jumper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 4,286
Default Re: What To Look For When Buying Computer Components

Quote:
Originally Posted by luke992006 View Post
All of the newer GPUĒS (some 7 series cards, all 8 and 9 series cards) will need a power cable directly to them, so before buying a new cpu, make sure that you PSU can handle the power the video card will need.
Not all of the geforce 8 series card require power cables. The 8600gt and below do not need pcie power connectors. For ATi the HD 2600xt/HD3650 and bellow do not need a pcie power cable.

Something you might want to add add would be an explanation of ATi and Nvidia's model numbers so people understand why a 9600gt is not better than a 8800ulktra.

[Example]
Before buying a video card it helps to know a little about the naming system used by ATI and Nvidia.

__________________

__________________

AMD Phenom II x4 955 Black Edition : Asus M4A89GTD PRO : Corsair 550VX
G.SKILL Ripjaws 4x2gb DDR3 1600 : MSI Geforce GTX 770 2gb : Antec 300
OCZ Agility 2 60gb SSD (OS) : SanDisk Ultra 120gb SSD (Apps) : Crucial M500 240gb (Steam) : Win 8.1 Pro 64bit
2x Samsung 2494LW & 1x Dell U2312HM Eyefinity

Lenovo ThinkPad X220 : Core i5 2410M : 12.5" 1366x768 IPS LED display : Intel 320 Series 120gb SSD

Samsung Galaxy Note 3 stock 4.3 : Nexus 7 2 stock 4.4

Puddle Jumper is offline  
Closed Thread

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Very strange computer issues. No one knows the answers. Aiyana Hardware Repairs and Troubleshooting 9 03-29-2008 07:00 PM
What are you favorite places to buy computer components? Javalon System Upgrades 14 02-23-2008 05:14 PM
I need help picking a gaming computer rcnjsn9 New Systems | Building and Buying 14 11-21-2007 01:01 AM
computer freezes/beeps forever cullensmi Hardware Repairs and Troubleshooting 1 05-12-2007 12:40 PM
A Computer Building Guide.....by Elbatrop1 Elbatrop1 System Upgrades 31 04-07-2007 08:26 PM



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:59 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.