Static electricity? - Page 6 - Techist - Tech Forum

Go Back   Techist - Tech Forum > Computer Hardware > Monitors, Printers and Peripherals
Click Here to Login
Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 06-03-2005, 04:24 PM   #51 (permalink)
Him
Wizard Techie
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 3,190
Send a message via AIM to Him Send a message via Yahoo to Him
Default

Quote:
Originally posted by jolancer
yes, i completely understand that its amps that kill... but volts and amps are related.

example - if the coil in the test was using a 12v@15a source and it transforms it into 30000v to jump a gap, 12x15=180... 180/30000=.006amps. so it will not harm you.

and 1volt can push amps threw anything with a low enough resistence. but once it hits a human body(average 3000ohms) its harmless. so 30v is a average mimimum danger.
--------------------------------------------

and i cant say that you are rong about electricity being obsorbed by metal. but it doesnt sound resonable to me. you'd have to explain it more or link to an explaination.

metal has such low resistence i dont understand why it would absorb much of it at all. and electircity is sorta like a domino effect its not like trying to stuff Xamount of electrons in a limited space.
I cant really follow what your numbers are. I dont see how amplifying a 15amp source is going to take it down to .06 amps. I dont think you have your math right.

Picture the metal thing like water and juice. Juice being electricity water being metal: You have a certain amount of juice, and it is good. You add some water into the mixture it gets less good. You keep adding water to it it gets less and less good until it is all but water and a very small amount of juice. You add more metal to the mix (a car frame) it becomes less and less with all the places the electricity can go to and become less.
__________________

Him is offline  
Old 06-03-2005, 04:36 PM   #52 (permalink)
Monster Techie
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 1,349
Default

a coil converter or Transformer, outputs the same watt's as it imputs. so if Volts go up, amps go down, viseversa.

and i understand you example. but isnt that just relating to normal resistence? just like how if a signal in a wire fades over distance, because length of a wire increasess resistence the longer it gets. That doesnt apply to a very large mass of settel though with a short distence to ground, the electricity isnt going to circulate threw the frame, buts just going to strait down 1 part of the frame to ground.
__________________

jolancer is offline  
Old 06-03-2005, 04:39 PM   #53 (permalink)
Him
Wizard Techie
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 3,190
Send a message via AIM to Him Send a message via Yahoo to Him
Default

Electricity is going to take the path of least resistence, to the place that is best for it to go. If it can go to the ground, it is going to, but it can also dissipate in the frame. Like a computer case, where do you think that electricity goes when it is not plugged into the wall? Dissipates in the metal.

I really cannot say anything about the math on electricity, it has been a long time since I took the math portion so i would have to read up on it.
Him is offline  
Old 06-03-2005, 07:50 PM   #54 (permalink)
Monster Techie
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 1,349
Default

though im not going outa my way to research it. i would have to say your rong for the most part. unless a link to more info is provided or something.

cause example - if electricity passes threw the frame of a car, its headed strait down. so if it goes down a steel bar on the right side of the frame, its not going to turn around and start heading back up the left side of the frame, otherwise it would have to start heading back down again. and electricity only goes the quickest way to ground.
--------------------------

now that i think about it, maybe were sorta talking about 2 different things... electrical current is never absorbed, but since static electricity isnt a sustained power source. The power or voltave is used up as the current encounters resistence.

So its not disapated but rather the energy behind the current is depleted. So when an object is shocked, the current travels threw it untill it meats high resistence such as, air, wood, rubber, plastic. and a small amount of amp are probably pushed threw, but the energy is quickly depleted.
__________________

jolancer is offline  
Closed Thread

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:26 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.