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Old 05-10-2005, 08:52 PM   #11 (permalink)
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SATA is faster then IDE and the advantage of RAID if you ever decide to go that route.
Huh?? RAID is completely independent of SATA/IDE :-\.. You can have a RAID setup with IDE HDDs. And simply b/c SATA is capable of deliverying information faster through its interface doesn't mean HDDs take advantage of it these days. IDE based setups (these days) should provide similar performance due to the HDDs bottlenecks.

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Old 05-10-2005, 10:03 PM   #12 (permalink)
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sata doesn't do anything faster... Its **CAPABLE**of being faster.. The bottle neck isnt what connector you have, its the drive.

i've already explained this 10 times, search the forums.

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Old 05-10-2005, 11:14 PM   #13 (permalink)
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Does everything come to a bottleneck these days?

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Old 05-11-2005, 12:11 AM   #14 (permalink)
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He's confusing you...

"Native" SATA drives don't have an onboard adapter. When SATA technology first came out, this was the most common way to get a SATA-capable drive, and it caused a major bottleneck. Now, you can get native SATA drives, and there's no bottleneck.

Second, if you use a PCI controller card for SATA, you'll have a bottleneck because that's not as dedicated or fast as a native onboard SATA controller (which most boards have now).

So if you buy a new SATA drive (that's a true SATA drive) and your mobo has native SATA support (ports right on the board) you're going to notice a performance increase. SATA operates faster than the top IDE drives on the market.

Also, a SATA controller can do RAID without the need for a RAID controller card too.

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Old 05-11-2005, 12:23 AM   #15 (permalink)
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The "bottleneck" that has been mentioned so far in the thread had nothing to do with an adapter. It was merely pointed out that the speed (these days) is more dependent on the drive itself than the interface type. This is because the 7200 rpm HDDs don't fully take advantage of the higher bandwidth offered by SATA right now. Therefore, having a higher transfer rate is not as meaningful since the 7200 rpm HDDs don't use them.

That's why the HDDs were identified as a bottleneck when attempting to compare between the two interfaces. One can't truly do that until u use a HDD that uses the SATA bandwidth. But that will cost more money.. Certainly more than a typical 7200 rpm. So for all practical purposes, they should provide similar purformance (SATA, IDE).

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