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Old 03-01-2005, 06:55 PM   #21 (permalink)
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I just simply make sure to touch my power supply on the way to touching anything else To this day still haven't static'd anything
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Old 03-01-2005, 07:12 PM   #22 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally posted by MDupreejr
To this day still haven't static'd anything.
Me neither but it would only take one time to ruin your day.
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Old 03-01-2005, 09:39 PM   #23 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally posted by gsbtech
Your hands need to have the same electrostatic potential as your system. Current will flow if there is a difference in potential. It would do you no good to ground yourself on a pipe if your computer case is not grounded to the same pipe. Simple answer, touch the case or your power supply (if your case is plastic) or use a wrist strap.
??? all of your house have the same grounding point.

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Originally posted by gsbtech
In addition, avoid putting your hand acrosss the leads of a card or CPU. Even if you and the case are grounded, shorting leads can allow latent charge to flow.
exactly.
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Old 03-01-2005, 11:37 PM   #24 (permalink)
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Originally posted by EricB
??? all of your house have the same grounding point.
First, you should unplug your computer before you work on it. It should not be relevant at this point if you have a true ground in your house. In a perfect world, everything you assume grounded would all be the same. Have you tested your outlet and compared it to the plumbing? I don't even know from what country these posts are coming and how their building codes are written (or followed). However, you should be save if you are in contact with the case/PSU.

Also, what we are saying here applies only to the low voltage work in your computer. You shouldn't open your PSU or monitor unless you know what you are doing or are feeling suicidal. If you do have to open either, DON'T ground yourself to anythying!
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Old 03-02-2005, 12:05 AM   #25 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally posted by gsbtech
First, you should unplug your computer before you work on it. It should not be relevant at this point if you have a true ground in your house. In a perfect world, everything you assume grounded would all be the same. Have you tested your outlet and compared it to the plumbing? I don't even know from what country these posts are coming and how their building codes are written (or followed). However, you should be save if you are in contact with the case/PSU.

Also, what we are saying here applies only to the low voltage work in your computer. You shouldn't open your PSU or monitor unless you know what you are doing or are feeling suicidal. If you do have to open either, DON'T ground yourself to anythying!
I have a 46in big screen tv in the basement (52 in the main room). Years ago I was having a problem with the picture going out whenever somebody jump or hit the ground hard. it would eventually come back

a tv repairman told me something had got desoldered. so me and my 'fix everything' butt took it apart to fix it. I unplug it and got to messing around inside and got the shock of my life. I guess the tv discharge it static through me to ground. I'm lucky that it wasn't plugged in
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Old 03-02-2005, 01:31 AM   #26 (permalink)
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a normal person could mess around with ther PSU or Monitor if thy wont, but you'l have to leave it unpluged for a few days, or maybe a week, to let the capacitors discharge.
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Old 03-02-2005, 11:37 AM   #27 (permalink)
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A monitor capacitor could hold it's charge for months and it starts out at around 25,000V (compare that to your 110v outlet or your 12V MB). THere is a technique for discharging the capacitors. Make sure you know it well before you try. I just wanted to make sure noone extrapolated my grounding discussion to PSUs or Monitors.
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Old 03-02-2005, 11:50 AM   #28 (permalink)
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I learned have to discharge them with resistors on other electronics. I just didn't expect a tv to have that much charge
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