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Old 04-13-2004, 07:14 PM   #21 (permalink)
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also since its a new harddrive with brand new installation, you may have certain chipset drivers to install that are specific to the MBD... like IDE controllers, bridges and bus (AGP and PCI), etc. make sure you have those installed. probably called mainboard drivers or some such. check the manufacturer website (of the mother board).
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Old 04-14-2004, 11:07 PM   #22 (permalink)
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one thing that I would DEFINATLEY do is set it so windows doesn't restart after a system crash. It MAY be memory, but also power supply. If unsure how, rt click my computer and click properties. Click the 'advanced' tab and click on 'startup recovery'
button. Under system failure uncheck reboot. Then, when the system fails you can at least see that nice, pretty BSOD that we all so love.
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Old 04-15-2004, 07:03 AM   #23 (permalink)
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Killian .... firstly .. the edit button exists ...so u can edit ur posts

Please don't multi post ///

Secondly ... I just wanted to point out that faster harddrives do not consume more power as u suggest in ur post ..
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Old 04-15-2004, 04:42 PM   #24 (permalink)
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oh, they sure can as far as the RPM is involved. Allow me to explain to the doubter WHY. First off, faster hard disk drives tend to have more layered platers AND multiple read/write heads. This is fact AND I will later find some links to SHOW this. Simple science and mathmatics then show us how energy consumption is compared to and directly related to mass. More mass = more platers = more power consumption. More platers = (on a general rule, but I admit not ALWAYS true) faster seek times due to multiple spanning. Now the consumption is not great, but if a persons PSU is just BARELY squeeking by, then this is just adding more to it. Now take this SAME mass and increase the rotation speed (or RPM). It will now take more power to create the needed energy to spin 'up' the platters. Also, these same drives have a tendency to have longer 'spin down' times, which also wastes energy consumption. Here is one excerpt:


There are several reasons why power consumption is an area of concern for PC users. The first is that the amount of power needed by the hard disks must be provided for when specifying the power supply (although modern systems with one hard disk don't generally need to worry about this). The second is that the start-up power requirements of hard disks exceed their normal requirements and must be given special consideration in systems with multiple storage drives. The third is that more power consumption, all else being equal, equates to more heat dissipated by the drive. The final one is environmental: the trend is towards systems that use less power just for the sake of using less power!

The power consumption specifications provided for a drive vary from manufacturer to manufacturer. Some provide only a "typical" rating for the drive during average conditions, a start-up peak value for the +12 V voltage, and that's it. Others provide a comprehensive look at the drive's use of both +5 V and +12 V power under various conditions. For example, the table below contains the power consumption specifications for the IBM Deskstar 75GXP, four-and five platter models. Note that unlike most hard disk specifications, power consumption normally is higher for drives with more platters even within the same family--since they have more mass to move, more power is required to turn the platters. Many manufacturers just quote an average for the whole family, but IBM generally doesn't:

Operating Condition
+5 V draw (Amps, RMS)
+12 V draw (Amps, RMS)
Power Consumption (W)

Start-Up
Peak
0.81
1.81
--

Random R/W Operation
Peak
1.02
2.23
--

Average
0.41
0.78
11.5

Seek
Peak
0.47
2.23
--

Average
0.27
0.84
11.4

Idle
Average
0.24
0.57
8.1

Standby
Average
0.26
0.015
1.5

Sleep
Average
0.17
0.015
1.0


Examining these numbers reveals a number of facts about how the drive uses power. First, notice that when operating (platters spinning and actuator moving), the +12 V draw is about 0.8 A; when idle (platters spinning but actuator stationary), it is about 0.6 A; and when in standby (platters stationary), +12 V is about zero. This tells you that roughly 3/4 of the +12 V power is taken by the spindle motor and roughly 1/4 by the actuator assembly. +5 V is primarily used to drive the controller's components, which is why even in standby mode a fair percentage of the +5 V power required during operation.is needed. This is typical of modern drives. "Real-world" power consumption will generally be close to what the manufacturer specifies, but bear in mind that actual consumption will depend on a number of factors, most especially the manner in which the drive is used.

Power consumption is primarily affected by the design of the drive's spindle motor and the number and size of the spindle platters, and to a lesser extent, other components such as the actuator and controller board.
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Old 04-15-2004, 04:47 PM   #25 (permalink)
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Assuming you were not trying to be rude, oh and sometimes when I multiple post its because I have just returned into the room and want to type something in before the thought leaves my head or I have to run out the door. Unfortunatley, I'm doing this at work because being in networking and programming sometimes gets VERY boring, but when you have to jump up and go... not much choice, but most have not said a word and don't seem to care because most advice I have is sound. Speaking which, have a wireless node or access point down... God, sometimes just aint worth it, back to work!

Note: While spindle speed affects the media transfer rate, it is not proportional to it. The reason is that it is more difficult to read and write at very high linear densities when running at very high spindle speeds. This means that in some cases a drive running at 5400 RPM will have a higher areal density than a similar drive running at 7200 RPM. The transfer rate is still normally higher for the 7200 RPM drive, because the spindle speed is 33% higher and the linear areal density is usually only smaller by a factor of 10% or less (though this could change at any time; who knows what those engineers are up to! )

The power of the spindle motor has an impact on the drive's spin-up speed, for obvious reasons. Also, since the spindle motor is the primary consumer of power in the hard disk, its design has the biggest impact on overall power consumption. In some ways, slower drives have an advantage here; it takes longer to spin anything up to 10,000 RPM than to 5400 RPM (unless you use a correspondingly larger motor in the faster drive.)


(above is another excerpt)
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Old 04-15-2004, 04:57 PM   #26 (permalink)
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Killian... i appreciate ur effort ..n' the time u've taken out to collect all this ..

I had no intention to diss ya ..or somethin' like that ... Just wanted the right thing to be out here

Even after ur posting such an extensive post ... The last line says it all..
Quote:
Power consumption is primarily affected by the design of the drive's spindle motor and the number and size of the spindle platters, and to a lesser extent, other components such as the actuator and controller board.
It basically depends on the design of the spindle .. The no. of platter's on the drive do not nessecarliy increase with the size of the harddrive ... Also a harddrive spinning at higher rpm does not actually require more power ... There motor's are designed to consume the same amt of power n' rotate at higher rpm.

U can actually try this if u connect a wattmeter between the smps n' a hardrive ... Just spin up the drive using any 8051 based controller... Run this for like 20 mins n' measure power consumtion.
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Old 04-15-2004, 05:01 PM   #27 (permalink)
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ah, but wait! Here's the rest of it! Heh

It will not surprise you, given the precision involved in every facet of the construction of the hard disk drive, that the spindle motor has several important demands placed upon it. First, the motor must be of high quality, so it can run for thousands of hours, and tolerate thousands of start and stop cycles, without failing. Second, it must be run smoothly and with a minimum of vibration, due to the tight tolerances of the platters and heads inside the drive. Third, it must not generate excessive amounts of heat or noise. Fourth, it should not draw too much power. And finally, it must have its speed managed so that it turns at the proper speed.

To meet these demands, all PC hard disks use servo-controlled DC spindle motors. A servo system is a closed-loop feedback system; this is the exact same technology as is used in modern voice coil actuators, and I discuss how servo systems work in detail in that section. In the case of the spindle motor, the feedback for the closed-loop system comes in the form of a speed sensor. This provides the feedback information to the motor that allows it to spin at exactly the right speed.

All hard disk spindle motors are configured for direct connection; there are no belts or gears that are used to connect them to the hard disk platter spindle. The spindle onto which the platters are mounted is attached directly to the shaft of the motor. The platters are machined with a hole the exact size of the spindle, and are placed onto the spindle with separator rings (spacers) between them to maintain the correct distance and provide room for the head arms. The entire assembly is secured with a head cap and usually, lots of small Torx screws.



Components of the spindle motor assembly. Platters and spacer rings have the
same inside diameter and alternated over the spindle motor axis to build the
platter stack. The top cap goes, well, on top, and is secured using those annoying
teeny weeny Torx screws. Note that this particular drive does not have a
screw hole in the center of the spindle motor shaft to secure it to the drive cover.


The amount of work that the spindle motor has to do is dependent on a number of factors. The first is the size and number of platters that it must turn. Larger platters and more platters in a drive mean more mass for the motor to turn, so more powerful motors are required. The same is true of higher-speed drives. Finally, with power management becoming more of a concern today, users increasingly want hard disks that will spin up from a stopped position to operating speed quickly, which also requires faster or more powerful motors.
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Old 04-15-2004, 05:06 PM   #28 (permalink)
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Awe, I actually didn't take offense. Nice to have a challenge. Tell you, I get bored here so it gives me something to do, lol. Only thing I can say is it makes sense and it's what I've read. Of course each manufacturer is going to change and power consumption 10 years ago is greater than today, but I'm dealing with HDD lines emerging within 1 to 2 years. The drive spindle has not changed greatly, and as it says it takes larger and more powerful spindles, which also takes more power consumption due to quick 'up' and 'down' speed. Guy maybe wrong, but who knows. Anyhow, like I said... not taking offense, it HONESTLY gives me something to do around here. If nothing breaks down or no net configs to do I sit on my butt all day. First I thought 'Hell yeah! What a great job!' no it's 'GOD let something break.' Heh.
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