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Old 05-03-2008, 03:40 AM   #1 (permalink)
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Default Dynamic hard drive questions

Hi, I've been reading about striped volumes and I'm a bit curious about them. How exactly are they different from mirrored volumes? Mirrored volumes basically save the data twice right, once to one hard drive and once to the other, so the hard drives just mirror one another and that acts as fault protection in case one dies. But striped volumes do not protect your data, so the writing process is different, but how exactly? Both striped volumes and mirrored volumes allow you to utilize the storage space of only one hard drive right, since it's copying the same data onto each hard drive?

Also, is there a hard drive retrieval speed increase when you go from a simple volume to a striped volume? If so, how many times faster? Thanks
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Old 05-03-2008, 05:15 AM   #2 (permalink)
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Default Re: Dynamic hard drive questions

I believe 'striped volumes' and 'mirrored volumes' are both used in RAID arrays, which is very outdated nowdays.

Quote:
There are three key concepts in RAID: mirroring, the copying of data to more than one disk; striping, the splitting of data across more than one disk; and error correction, where redundant data is stored to allow problems to be detected and possibly fixed (known as fault tolerance). Different RAID levels use one or more of these techniques, depending on the system requirements.
Wiki has the answers

RAID EXPLAINED

If you want to get a detailed answer on striped and mirrored disks, here's the links:
striping
Mirroring
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Old 05-03-2008, 06:24 PM   #3 (permalink)
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Default Re: Dynamic hard drive questions

Thanks, I'm pretty clear on it now. Why are RAID arrays out of date now? I thought many people still used them because of their fault protection and increased speed?
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Old 05-03-2008, 08:35 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Default Re: Dynamic hard drive questions

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Originally Posted by S0ULphIRE View Post
I believe 'striped volumes' and 'mirrored volumes' are both used in RAID arrays, which is very outdated nowdays.
Depends on what you are using for and how much money you want to spend.
I still used Mirrored Volumes a lot. RAID 0 is some thing i have no interested in as you have the problem that if you loose 1 drive, you loose the lot. Therefore, if I needed an extremely large volume, I would be using not less than RAID5
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Old 05-03-2008, 10:58 PM   #5 (permalink)
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Default Re: Dynamic hard drive questions

Older versions of raid are not used as much as a RAID 5 setup, or RAID 1. Zero, Two, Three, and Four are honestly, things of the past, and RAID 6, isn't seen that much either, you will usualy want a RAID 5 or some combo of raid levels.
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Old 05-03-2008, 11:12 PM   #6 (permalink)
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Default Re: Dynamic hard drive questions

usually what you see nowadays is raid 1, 0, 5 or a combo of 0+1 or the likes. usually you see it in businesses only though. raid was never really a common household thing. not like a swifer or a plunger.
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