AMD processor SPEC HELP NEEDED - Techist - Tech Forum

Go Back   Techist - Tech Forum > Computer Hardware > Monitors, Printers and Peripherals
Click Here to Login
Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 06-08-2005, 03:54 AM   #1 (permalink)
Banned
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 76
Default AMD processor SPEC HELP NEEDED

this any good???

Model: AMD™ Athlon™ 64 3000+
Core: Winchester
Speed: 1.8GHz
System Bus: Up to 1600 MHz
Cache: 512KB L2 Cache
Process: 0.13 Micron
Socket: 939
Packaging: OEM
and does System Bus mean frontside bus? FSB
__________________

eatbutt is offline  
Old 06-08-2005, 04:15 AM   #2 (permalink)
Techie Beyond Description
 
Apokalipse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 14,559
Default

I'd look for the Venice rather than the Winchester
*edit* those specs are wrong. Winchesters are 0.09 micron (or 90nm) not 0.13

and the Athlon 64's don't have a FSB. the system bus is their equivalent.
basically the FSB is the link between memory and CPU via the memory controller chip. because the Athlon 64's have their memory controller chip onboard, the FSB is inside the CPU itself and not through the motherboard. the link between CPU and memory is called Hypertransport (or HTT)
__________________

__________________
Apokalipse is offline  
Old 06-08-2005, 04:31 AM   #3 (permalink)
Banned
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 76
Default

k, ty, learned something there.
so is the cache and all that jazz good thoguh?
eatbutt is offline  
Old 06-08-2005, 05:20 AM   #4 (permalink)
Lord Techie
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: asdf
Posts: 8,886
Default

Yea other than it being winchester which there is currently a newer better core out.
c0rr0sive is offline  
Old 06-08-2005, 07:38 AM   #5 (permalink)
Lord Techie
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 8,013
Send a message via AIM to DJ-CHRIS
Default

It's a good processor, they got the BUS SPEED wrong, stupid noob's.

Currently the best core is the Venice Core, which is really overclockable and features SSE3 instructions for enhanced peformance
DJ-CHRIS is offline  
Old 06-09-2005, 01:41 AM   #6 (permalink)
Banned
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 76
Default

pi
mp





ty
eatbutt is offline  
Old 06-09-2005, 01:47 AM   #7 (permalink)
Monster Techie
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 1,487
Default

It's a decent processor.
__________________
<font size=\"1\">Intel Pentium 4 3.4GHZ HT-------------------AMD Athlon 64 3000+ Winchester
Intel Stock CPU Cooler------------------------Zalman 7700-Cu
Idle: 51C---------------------------------------Idle: 21C
Load: 72C--------------------------------------Load: 28C
ASUS P4C800-E Deluxe-----------------------GIGABYTE K8NF4-9 NForce4 4X
512MBX2 Corsair XMS 2-2-2-5 PC-3200-----512MBX2 Corsair XMS 2-2-2-5 PC-3200
ATI RADEON X800 XT Platinum Edition-------ATI RADEON X800 XL
Creative Sound Blaster Audigy 2 ZS----------Creative Sound Blaster Audigy 2 ZS
Western Digital Raptor 37GB 10K------------2X Western Digital SATA150 Caviar SE 80GB RAID 0
Antec True 480W------------------------------Thermaltake Silent PurePower 680W
Zalman 5.1 Headphones----------------------Zalman 5.1 Headphones
Zalman High Sensitivity Microphone----------Zalman High Sensitivity Microphone
Microsoft Multimedia Keyboard 1.0A----------Logitech Media Keyboard
Microsoft Intellimouse Explorer 4.0A---------Logitech MX510
3DMark05: 5,928------------------------------3DMark05: 5,000</font>
dale5605 is offline  
Old 06-09-2005, 08:49 AM   #8 (permalink)
Field Engineer
 
SHAWN's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 4,697
Send a message via AIM to SHAWN
Default

Quote:
Originally posted by apokalipse
I'd look for the Venice rather than the Winchester
*edit* those specs are wrong. Winchesters are 0.09 micron (or 90nm) not 0.13

and the Athlon 64's don't have a FSB. the system bus is their equivalent.
basically the FSB is the link between memory and CPU via the memory controller chip. because the Athlon 64's have their memory controller chip onboard, the FSB is inside the CPU itself and not through the motherboard. the link between CPU and memory is called Hypertransport (or HTT)

Learned something new today. Thank You!!
__________________
A+, Network + , HP Certified Tech and MCP

Specs: AMD Phenom II X6 1095T, Asus M477TD, 8GB GSkill Ripjaws DDR3 1600 7-8-7-24 1T, 128GB Crucial M4 SSD, ATi HD4650, W7, 27" HL272 Monitor
SHAWN is offline  
Old 06-09-2005, 11:46 AM   #9 (permalink)
003
Wizard Techie
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 3,312
Default

Quote:
Originally posted by apokalipse
I'd look for the Venice rather than the Winchester
*edit* those specs are wrong. Winchesters are 0.09 micron (or 90nm) not 0.13

and the Athlon 64's don't have a FSB. the system bus is their equivalent.
basically the FSB is the link between memory and CPU via the memory controller chip. because the Athlon 64's have their memory controller chip onboard, the FSB is inside the CPU itself and not through the motherboard. the link between CPU and memory is called Hypertransport (or HTT)
The winchester's are not 90nm, they are 130nm and always have been. where ever did you hear that they were not?
__________________
so, umm, err yeah
003 is offline  
Old 06-09-2005, 11:53 AM   #10 (permalink)
Wizard Techie
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 4,010
Default

From somewhere with the right facts. The winchesters were the first AMD 64's with 90nm.

(in the link in the sig, on CPU-Z it says 90nm too.)


The Winchesters are still good, but if you are getting a new CPU than the Venice is what you want, better overclockability, and the SSE3 instructions.
__________________

__________________

Cisco CCNA, Comptia A+, 1/3 through CCNP
Trifid is offline  
Closed Thread

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:16 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.