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Old 05-07-2004, 10:05 AM   #11 (permalink)
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Damn - You guys are really making this harder than it needs to be.

Nanowarrior, you need to find a good tutorial on binary numbers, rather than trying to figure out charts.

Here is one site where you can read up on it.

http://www.swansontec.com/sbinary.htm
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Old 05-07-2004, 12:21 PM   #12 (permalink)
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I read it (thanks for the link) but I still have 2 more questions.

1.Where it mentions 76 being represented as 1001100 in binary language. Does this mean what the number 76 is actually represented? In other words if I were to type 76 is that how it would look behind the scenes?

2.Also is there a way to calculate what the letter t or the number 4 is represented in binary language? Also in other words, how do I caculate what the actual letter t or the actual number 4 is in binary language? You know, like if I where to type it.(if theres a way)
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Old 05-07-2004, 02:43 PM   #13 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally posted by NanoWarrior
I read it (thanks for the link) but I still have 2 more questions.

1.Where it mentions 76 being represented as 1001100 in binary language. Does this mean what the number 76 is actually represented? In other words if I were to type 76 is that how it would look behind the scenes?
Nanowarrior, let’s back it up a bit.

First you need to understand how computers process information or instruction sets. PCs or the components inside your PCs obviously do not communicate in any type of human language that you and I use. There is Assembly language which is the language between PCs or computer components and this is done by using two numbers; 1 & 0. There is another language (Programming language – written in C+/C++) but for your purpose here; it is not important and I will not go into it because it will just confuse you further.

Programming in assembly language is slow and can be error-prone but there are definite advantage of using it. To get your answer why, go back to the link I gave you earlier and read and understand the first 2 paragraphs.

Quote:
Originally posted by NanoWarrior
2.Also is there a way to calculate what the letter t or the number 4 is represented in binary language? Also in other words, how do I caculate what the actual letter t or the actual number 4 is in binary language? You know, like if I where to type it.(if theres a way)
If you understood the link that I gave you, and understand how the binary number system works, you would know the answer to some of your questions.

2^0 = 1. 2 to the power of 0 equals 1. (In fact, anytime you take a number and raise it to the power of 0, the result is always 1).
2^1 = 2 (2 = 2)
2^2 = 4 (2 x 2 = 4)
2^3 = 8 (2 x 2 x 2 = 8)
2^4 = 16 (2 x 2 x 2 x 2 = 16)

So, in binary format if you want to represent the decimal number 4, you would write it out like thus: 0100.

I don’t know why you are asking about the letter T. The heximal number system has nothing to do with the letter T and only goes up to F. If you want to express that the letter T is the 20th letter in the alphabet, then using the binary format, you write it like so: 1111 0101.

If you’re asking how the computer processes the information when you press the T key on your keyboard – that’s a different matter entirely.

Each key on your keyboard has a certain value or function attached to it. when you press the T key on your keyboard, the computer knows to display the corresponding character on your screen. That character may be designed in binary language but has nothing to do with the fact that T is the 20th letter in the alphabet.
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