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Old 02-20-2006, 03:17 PM   #41 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally posted by 003
AS5 also conducts electricity.
Negatory. From the AS5 website;
Quote:
Not Electrically Conductive:
Arctic Silver 5 was formulated to conduct heat, not electricity.
Quote:
Originally posted by 003
And if you put the PC in the freezer, the parts like the CPU and stuff would heat up.
I'm sorry, but that didn't make any sense. Cold air goes onto the CPU = colder CPU. And incase you haven't noticed, the CPU is ALWAYS hotter than it's surroundings, even at room temperature.

Quote:
Originally posted by 003
And there is "frozen" mist inside freezers, and when that hits the heated up parts, it melts and turns to water, or condensation if you want to call it that.
That didn't make any sense either. If something is frozen, then it will settle at the bottom. If something is floating around in the air, then it is NOT frozen. You cannot have both. Also, its not the air that cools the processor, its the heatsink. The fan blows cold air onto the heatsink, which cools the heatsink, which cools the processor. Unless you're suggesting that the Heatsink is made out of vaporous ice particles, it won't be shorting out the CPU.
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Old 02-20-2006, 03:31 PM   #42 (permalink)
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If you look in the freezer, you will see a sort of "mist". It's highly chilled water that is blown into the freezer. That is how people make phase change coolers out of freezer engines. It unfreezes and turns to water when it touches hot things. Quoted from the AS5 instructions:

Quote:
While much safer than silver greases engineered for high electrical conductivity, Arctic Silver thermal compound should be kept away from electrical traces, pins, and leads. The compound is slightly capacitive and could cause problems if it bridged two close-proximity electrical paths.
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so, umm, err yeah
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Old 02-20-2006, 03:43 PM   #43 (permalink)
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That is simply a note, not a declaration. People that use DICE and LN2 coat the motherboard in AS5. I have proof of working systems, do you have proof of failed systems?

Regardless of the mist, its the HSF that cools the CPU, not the air. The fan doesn't blow air onto the CPU, it blows air onto the HSF.
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Old 02-20-2006, 03:47 PM   #44 (permalink)
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Yeah but it still leaks and turns to water on the motherboard. Ok well then IDK about as5, if you want to paint your mobo with it, go ahead, but I don't want to take any chances with something that could possibly short out the PC. Besides, AS5 is expensive!
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Old 02-20-2006, 03:55 PM   #45 (permalink)
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lol wow this thread has some interesting stuff on it and btw the mist in the freezer isn't frozen particles its water vapor if it was frozen particles it would be snow
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Old 02-20-2006, 04:41 PM   #46 (permalink)
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Hmm, I think my Chem teacher said that its water particles that have condensation on the surface or something like that. I just had Chem last semester, so I kinda remember that.
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Old 02-20-2006, 04:51 PM   #47 (permalink)
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water "particles" don't "have" condensation. They, "water molecules", "condensate", to condense, on a cooler surface as they themselves have cooled from the hyperactive state of a gas to that of a liquid.

The walls of a freezer would collect air vapor traced with water and would cool it paaast a liquid into a solid (frost, people). The computer itself would be simply putting off a "see your breath" effect, ever adding to the frost on the freezer walls. The only creation of water that might occur would be the heat rising from the computer and melting the frost on the ceiling of the freezer. Frost would still be minimal as the computer itself does not add air, but heat.
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Old 02-20-2006, 08:29 PM   #48 (permalink)
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Seems as though the only people here educated in the fine art of Chemistry is BennyV and Flanker.

The idea would work, you guys think since the computer is hotter then its surroundings cold air is going to condense onto the case and the inner components, which makes sense, thats how frost is formed. So basically, yeah, the computer would have a layer of frost surrounding it :P

Ways you can avoid that. You can put your computer in a closed apparatus INSIDE the freezer to reduce chances of hardware failure (although I'm not too sure hardware would fail due to frost formation). There will still be condensation however minimal, most of the condensation would form around the apparatus, like a box or something.
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Old 02-20-2006, 08:35 PM   #49 (permalink)
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I really feel like what I said has merit, and I don't think septoid has the authority to declare who knows what about chemistry...

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Old 02-20-2006, 10:30 PM   #50 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally posted by Flanker
Negatory. From the AS5 website
The site does say

"Arctic Silver 5 was formulated to conduct heat, not electricity."

Saying this does not guarantee that AS5 doesn't conduct electricity. Just because it was "formulated" to conduct heat doesn't mean it DOESN'T conduct electricity.

But then it says this afterward:

"(While much safer than electrically conductive silver and copper greases, Arctic Silver 5 should be kept away from electrical traces, pins, and leads. While it is not electrically conductive, the compound is very slightly capacitive and could potentially cause problems if it bridges two close-proximity electrical paths.)"

Look at the section titled "Not Electrically Conductive."

http://www.arcticsilver.com/as5.htm
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