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Old 01-25-2006, 08:48 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Default What Is Process Type

when i look at processors on sites it says process type and usually there is things like .13um and 90nm so on and so forth
i was just wondering what this is and witch is the best kind thanks for your cooperation

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Old 01-25-2006, 08:50 PM   #2 (permalink)
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i'm not too sure about the .13um but the lower nm count means that it runs cooler.
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Old 01-25-2006, 09:07 PM   #3 (permalink)
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process type is basically the size of the core. .13um is micrometres and is equal to 130nm as such is larger. the smaller the core the more efficiently it is cooled. 90nm cores are the newer technology.
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Old 01-25-2006, 09:16 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Right. Usually the smaller the better. I think they're working on 65nm cores.

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Old 01-25-2006, 09:19 PM   #5 (permalink)
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intel has already released a 65nm core but that doesn't make it good lol. i'll take my dual 90nm cores over a single 65nm intel core any day.
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Old 01-25-2006, 11:08 PM   #6 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally posted by nitestick
intel has already released a 65nm core but that doesn't make it good lol. i'll take my dual 90nm cores over a single 65nm intel core any day.
RGR that!
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Old 01-26-2006, 10:37 PM   #7 (permalink)
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The different process types are just a measure of how precise they can manufacture CPUs. The smaller the number, the more precise they can make it.

Usually, when the process gets smaller, they can make chips more energy efficient, and jam more performance into the same size of CPU die.

Currently, Intel has some 65nm chips out that dont seem to perform much better than their 90nm counterparts, other than heat-wise.
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Old 01-26-2006, 10:39 PM   #8 (permalink)
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yea i know my x800xl comes with like 110 and it makes it so it doesnt overclock well. 90nm is better than 110nm
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