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Old 03-19-2006, 09:46 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Default My planned career path

I'm considering a career in computer technology and have been doing some research in order to decide which path would be the best for me.

I was planning on getting my A+ to start. After I secure a job with that cert (entry level, I know) I was planning on pursuing my MCSE or some other Microsoft cert.

So, what do you guys think of that path? Also, what kind of pay could one expect with an A+ in my area (Huntsville, AL)? And, what do some of you think of self-education vs. classroom when pursuring an A+? When pursuing an MCSE?

I know it's a lot of questions. I'd appreciate any advice anyone could give me.
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Old 03-19-2006, 09:59 PM   #2 (permalink)
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Self-study for certifications is fine. You can learn a lot if you're dedicated and wont have to put up with the classroom ********. You should not expect much with just an A+, like you said. You will probally start at minimum wage or acouple bucks above it. Even with a MCSE, you will need to work your way up the food chain, and in IT it takes awhile. If you got a 4 year degree, you would have a better chance of moving up more quickly. If I was you, I would just get a 4 year degree, then get a job and worry about certifications later. But thats just me .
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Old 03-19-2006, 10:36 PM   #3 (permalink)
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A+ is really entry level. If you went off of A+ alone, you likely wont make much more than $10/hour (at least that's how it is locally). A+ will usually land you a job at Best Buy, Staples, or a regular computer shop...nothing really fancy.

BUT, if you combine that A+ with some Microsoft certs, even a Cisco cert or two, and BAM! You start getting somewhere.

MCSA and MCSE is made up of different areas of material. You need to pass a certain amount of MCP tests to be designated as an MSCA or MCSE. MCSA requires less tests than MCSE.

Cisco's entry level cert is CCNA. CCNA seems to be an all around good cert to have.

If you were more interested in computer hardware itself and not networking and managing corporate environments, then University might be the way to go. This will normally involve a degree in Computer Engineering. Chankama, in another post, just mentioned that he got a job in his field, from going to University for Computer Engineering. Hit him up with some questiions on such things if you like.
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Old 03-19-2006, 11:27 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally posted by Elbatrop1
A+ is really entry level. If you went off of A+ alone, you likely wont make much more than $10/hour (at least that's how it is locally). A+ will usually land you a job at Best Buy, Staples, or a regular computer shop...nothing really fancy.

BUT, if you combine that A+ with some Microsoft certs, even a Cisco cert or two, and BAM! You start getting somewhere.

MCSA and MCSE is made up of different areas of material. You need to pass a certain amount of MCP tests to be designated as an MSCA or MCSE. MCSA requires less tests than MCSE.

Cisco's entry level cert is CCNA. CCNA seems to be an all around good cert to have.

If you were more interested in computer hardware itself and not networking and managing corporate environments, then University might be the way to go. This will normally involve a degree in Computer Engineering. Chankama, in another post, just mentioned that he got a job in his field, from going to University for Computer Engineering. Hit him up with some questiions on such things if you like.
I agree with some of the things you're saying but computer engineering is not messing around with hardware like IT people do. It is much, much more then that. Four year degrees are good for anything, and now a days you almost need them to work anywhere. Believe me the market is just going to keep getting more and more competitive. A lot of people get their masters to have an edge over most people. This trend will continue just like it has with college degrees 50+ years ago.
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Old 03-19-2006, 11:39 PM   #5 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally posted by raross
I agree with some of the things you're saying but computer engineering is not messing around with hardware like IT people do. It is much, much more then that. Four year degrees are good for anything, and now a days you almost need them to work anywhere. Believe me the market is just going to keep getting more and more competitive. A lot of people get their masters to have an edge over most people. This trend will continue just like it has with college degrees 50+ years ago.
I totally agree that it is much more than that. I was giving a specific example
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Old 03-20-2006, 07:25 AM   #6 (permalink)
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A spoke to someone yesterday in a book store who claimed to have been in the computer business for a while. He said that the computer business is an industry where no one cares how you know what you know. Only that you know it. From this he implied that college degrees in the field of computers were not as much a prerequisite as there are in other fields. One could do self study, pay for the exams and earn just about every cert known to exist, and not even visit an admissions office.

What do you guys think of that?
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Old 03-20-2006, 07:31 AM   #7 (permalink)
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Yes and no. It is true that you can self-teach yourself a lot of things. But, nothing replaces a diploma or degree.
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