Does Virtualization hold back the OS? - Techist - Tech Forum

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Old 04-22-2014, 10:00 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Default Does Virtualization hold back the OS?

Just curious. Would virtualizing something like... Backtrack(now known as Kali) on a windows OS hold backtrack back. I dont mean on a hardware level. I mean on a logical level. I know certain IT security tools such as wire-shark, etherape,aircrack, just don't work properly on windows. Would a Virt of the linux OS be held back by the OS holding the virt?
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Old 04-22-2014, 11:06 PM   #2 (permalink)
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Default Re: Does Virtualization hold back the OS?

It can because you're using virtual hardware, unless you have a VM that can actually use the host hardware.

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Old 04-23-2014, 12:29 PM   #3 (permalink)
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Default Re: Does Virtualization hold back the OS?

A vm that uses host hardware. Would it just be easier to have a dual boot?
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Old 04-23-2014, 01:16 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Default Re: Does Virtualization hold back the OS?

DO explain! using the host machine vs using the vm hardware?
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Old 04-24-2014, 10:55 AM   #5 (permalink)
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Default Re: Does Virtualization hold back the OS?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Slacker View Post
DO explain! using the host machine vs using the vm hardware?
The article linked below explains how the hardware and hyper-v hypervisor work together.

Hyper-V Architecture







edit -

Then there's the notion of ring security too


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ring_(computer_security)

Computer operating systems provide different levels of access to resources. A protection ring is one of two or more hierarchical levels or layers of privilege within the architecture of a computer system. This is generally hardware-enforced by some CPU architectures that provide different CPU modes at the hardware or microcode level. Rings are arranged in a hierarchy from most privileged (most trusted, usually numbered zero) to least privileged (least trusted, usually with the highest ring number). On most operating systems, Ring 0 is the level with the most privileges and interacts most directly with the physical hardware such as the CPU and memory.

Special gates between rings are provided to allow an outer ring to access an inner ring's resources in a predefined manner, as opposed to allowing arbitrary usage. Correctly gating access between rings can improve security by preventing programs from one ring or privilege level from misusing resources intended for programs in another. For example, spyware running as a user program in Ring 3 should be prevented from turning on a web camera without informing the user, since hardware access should be a Ring 1 function reserved for device drivers. Programs such as web browsers running in higher numbered rings must request access to the network, a resource restricted to a lower numbered ring.


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